ASA recognizes Mary Hinton Bass as Heritage Award Winner

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (November 1, 2023) – The American Shorthorn Association Awards hosted their Annual Awards Banquet on Saturday, October 22, 2023, at the Hilton Kansas City Airport in Kansas City, Mo.

Mary Hinton Bass of Olton, Texas, was honored as a 2023 Heritage Award Winner. The Shorthorn Heritage Award recognizes Shorthorn members who have shown exceptional leadership for Shorthorn activities in a state or regional area. These honorees are persons that have shown exceptional passion in all areas of the breed. Award recipients have promoted the breed by taking leadership roles within their respective geographical areas. They are individuals that can be given credit to helping with the long-term success of the breed at any level. They have attended functions, been a mainstay, and have shown their passion and love for the breed and the people in the breed. A Heritage Award winner is a true Shorthorn enthusiast who has positively impacted the breed to the benefit of all Shorthorn breeders.

Mary received her first Shorthorn heifer when her dad purchased a heifer for her to show in 4H. This began her ongoing passion of 62 years being involved in promoting the Shorthorn breed. She was a charter member of the Texas Junior Shorthorn Association and later served as secretary/treasurer for three years. She served as a princess and the Texas Shorthorn Lassie and represented the state in the National Lassie Queen contest in 1969. While in college she met her husband, J.O. and they moved her herd to his farm in west Texas and call it MJ Shorthorns.    

She served for many years as the Texas Shorthorn Association secretary/treasurer. As part of her duties, she traveled to a few events to promote the Shorthorn breed. She served on the National Shorthorn Lassie board and was honored as National Lassie of the Year in 1985. After her son James began showing, they traveled to shows across the state. She hopes to be around long enough to get her grandkids started in the Shorthorn business.

The American Shorthorn Association congratulates Mary Hinton Bass on the prestigious honor as being selected as a 2023 Heritage Award Winner.

About ASA

The American Shorthorn Association’s mission is to serve all members, protect the integrity of the herdbook and database; enhance and communicate the value of the Shorthorn breed, and expand the use of Shorthorn genetics in the U.S. beef industry. Visit shorthorn.org to learn more.

American Shorthorn Association :: 7607 NW Prairie View Road, Kansas City, MO 64151:: 816.599.7777 ###

ASA Recognizes Alan K. Sears as Merit Award Winner

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (November 1, 2023) – The American Shorthorn Association Awards hosted their Annual Awards Banquet on Saturday, October 22, 2023, at the Hilton Kansas City Airport in Kansas City, Mo.

Alan K. Sears of Eaton, Colo., was honored as 2023 Merit Award Winner. The merit award is given to recognize individuals that are not Shorthorn breeders who support and promote the cattle industry. This award honors those beef cattle industry leaders who have specifically assisted and had a positive influence on the Shorthorn breed. These individuals have been exceptional supporters and dedicated friends of the Shorthorn breed for many years. This describes Alan K. Sears and shows why he is deserving of his recognition.

Sears first beef project was a red Shorthorn heifer purchased at the Indiana Shorthorn Association Blue Ribbon Sale. After that first heifer, he was hooked on the breed. Shorthorn cattle and the Purebred Beef industry became his passion. After graduating from Purdue University, he was hired in 1977 to work at the ASA to run junior activities and as a field representative. He was integral in merging the youth conference and junior national show into one event.   

After leaving the ASA, Sears worked at Drovers Journal and then the North American Limousin Foundation. He found his way back to the Shorthorn breed when he was hired in 1993 to work for the Shorthorn Country magazine. After his time at the magazine, he went to work for the Western Livestock Reporter and then Deiter Bros., followed by Five Star Cattle Systems. In 2008, he returned to Western Ag Report as well as starting his own business providing sale management, genetic and marketing consultation services. You can find him at different Shorthorn sales across the country.

The American Shorthorn Association congratulates Alan K. Sears on the prestigious honor as being selected as a 2023 Merit Award Winner.

About ASA

The American Shorthorn Association’s mission is to serve all members, protect the integrity of the herdbook and database; enhance and communicate the value of the Shorthorn breed, and expand the use of Shorthorn genetics in the U.S. beef industry. Visit shorthorn.org to learn more.

American Shorthorn Association :: 7607 NW Prairie View Road, Kansas City, MO 64151:: 816.599.7777 ###

New ASA Board Members and Officers Elected

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (November 1, 2023) – During the American Shorthorn Association Annual Meeting on October 22, 2023, delegates from across the country gathered at the Hilton Kansas City Airport to elect new ASA board members.

The nominating committee submitted three candidates for the available positions. Tyler Cates from Ind., Cory Bollum from Minn., and Mark Gordon from Ill. All three will serve a three-year term; Cates and Cory will serve their first term, Gordon will serve his second term. 

The board elected new officers for the nine-member board. The new president of the board is Toby Jordan of Ind. The vice-president is Lee Miller of Ohio and the executive director is John Sonderman of Neb. They serve alongside Jeff Bedwell of Okla., John Russell of Texas, and Rick Osterday of South Dakota.

About ASA

The American Shorthorn Association’s mission is to serve all members, protect the integrity of the herdbook and database; enhance and communicate the value of the Shorthorn breed, and expand the use of Shorthorn genetics in the U.S. beef industry. Visit shorthorn.org to learn more.

American Shorthorn Association :: 7607 NW Prairie View Road, Kansas City, MO 64151:: 816.599.7777

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ASA Holds Annual Meeting in Kansas City

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (November 1, 2023) – During the American Shorthorn Association Annual Meeting on October 22, 2023, more than 100 members from 24 states gathered at the Hilton Kansas City Airport to elect new ASA board members, learn about the state of the association and receive awards.

The event kicked off on October 21 at the ASA office with a social for breeders to gather and enjoy the company of new and old friends.

The next morning, delegates convened to listen to Montie D. Soules, Executive Secretary/CEO of ASA, share the State of the Association. This included Key Performance Indicators, finances, and other association updates.

“The ASA had a really great year,” Soules said. “The association continues to grow, and we are headed in a positive direction. We couldn’t do it without all the people of the breed.”

After the report, the nominating committee submitted three candidates for the available board positions. Tyler Cates from Ind., Cory Bollum from Minn., and Mark Gordon from Ill. All three will serve a three-year term; Cates and Cory will serve their first term; Gordon will serve his second term. The board elected new officers for the nine-member board. The new president of the board is Toby Jordan of Ind. The vice-president is Lee Miller of Ohio and the executive director is John Sonderman of Neb. They serve alongside Jeff Bedwell of Okla., John Russell of Texas, and Rick Osterday of South Dakota.

Following the election of board members, attendees heard updates from junior activities, the Shorthorn Youth Development Fund Foundation, the Shorthorn Foundation, and several other committees.

After the meeting adjourned, attendees enjoyed a steak luncheon and listened to motivational speaker Matt Booth who encouraged positivity in daily life.

The final event was the awards presentation. Breeders who registered more than 100 head in a fiscal year were given the Century Club Award. Next animal owners received certificates for Performance Animals that met certain qualifications. The National and Regional Show Winners for 2022-2023 were recognized with leather banners and metal awards. The final presentations of the evening were special recognition awards. This year the Heritage Awards went to Mary Hinton Bass and Bryan & Marti Warner. The Merit Award recognized Alan K. Sears. The Builders of the Breed were Ward Bakenhus, Bill Bales & Joe Bales, and Rick Leone & Family.

In 2024, the ASA Annual Meeting will be October 26 in Kansas City, Missouri.

About ASA

The American Shorthorn Association’s mission is to serve all members, protect the integrity of the herdbook and database; enhance and communicate the value of the Shorthorn breed, and expand the use of Shorthorn genetics in the U.S. beef industry. Visit shorthorn.org to learn more.

American Shorthorn Association :: 7607 NW Prairie View Road, Kansas City, MO 64151:: 816.599.7777

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SYDF BEEF Purchase!

The Shorthorn Youth Development Fund (SYDF) was established in 2020 to provide financial support that will sustain and expand excellent programming to develop Shorthorn youth as cattle producers and responsible, productive citizens. SYDF is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and a resource that allows you to directly invest in the future of the breed that is your business, your lifestyle and your passion. 

According to a survey conducted at the 2015 Shorthorn Impact Conference, 61% of the breeders in attendance started as junior members. These now active members of the American Shorthorn Association prove how important youth development is, and that junior involvement is the pathway to the future success of our breed. One example of excellent programming that SYDF supports is the National Junior Shorthorn Show & Youth Conference (NJSS). It’s an action-packed week of learning and fun that develops skills, knowledge, and confidence, along with love for the breed and lifetime friendships. The cost to produce this annual event is more than $320,000, mostly raised through sponsorships and donations. 

PURCHASING SYDF’S BRAND OF “RED, WHITE AND ROAN ALL BEEF SNACKS” IS AN EASY AND DELICIOUS WAY YOU CAN SUPPORT THE SHORTHORN BREED’S YOUTH DEVELOPMENT MISSION! 

100% SHORTHORN BEEF SNACKS TASTE GREAT AND ARE PACKAGED TO MAKE APPEALING GIFTS FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CUSTOMERS AND BUSINESS ASSOCIATES!

To learn about other ways to support SYDF, visit our website: https://shorthorn.org/sydf/

No contribution is too small, and every dollar counts!

By making the commitment to “pay it forward” through an annual contribution to the Shorthorn Youth Development Fund, today’s breeders accept responsibility of seeing to it that our youth have the opportunities they need to prepare for their time as the Shorthorn breeders of tomorrow.

Click here to order Red, White, and Roan Beef

The Shorthorn Bull Pen

Are you caught up on The Shorthorn Bull Pen podcast episodes? You can watch episodes on YouTube by clicking each available episode below or you can find them anywhere you listen to podcasts (Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast, Amazon Music).

Episodes are released the Wednesday after the second Insider e-blast of the month. We share them on Facebook or follow us on YouTube/podcast services to be notified of the next available episode!

Ep. 1 – Frank Lucas (R), U.S. Representative, Oklahoma (3rd District)

Ep. 2 – Frank Stoltzfus, NCBA Region 1 Policy VP

Ep. 3 – IGS, Dr. Wade Shaffer and Chip Kemp

Ep. 4 – John Sonderman, ASA President

Ep. 5 – Past AJSA Presidents

Ep. 6. – AJSA Board of Directors (releases Aug. 23)

Ep. 7 – Shelby Diehm, Director of Youth Activities (releases Sept. 20)

Shorthorn Apparel

Have you checked out the Shorthorn Apparel we have available? The Shorthorn online store will be open from July 18th – August 25th.  All proceeds benefit the Shorthorn Youth Development Fund. Click here to order your apparel. Check out what we have available below! T-Shirts, Windbreaker, Sweatshirts, Hats and Youth Shirts!

**Please note these are pre-orders, apparel does not enter production until the ordering window is closed. **

We appreciate your support of the SYDF!!

Adult Shirts
Adult Sweatshirts
Hats
Youth Shirts

Protect Your Investment

This time of year, a lot of money is being invested in future herd sires for both Shorthorn breeders and commercial producers. Plenty of preparations go into making the selection of your next bull, and we all enjoy the thrill of winning the bid at auction or striking the deal private treaty. However, the purchase is merely the beginning. You want to protect your investment to maximize his return to your operation, and proper considerations need to be taken to maximize the performance of your newest team member while attempting to minimize your risk.

The first step to minimize your risk in this purchase is making the decision regarding mortality insurance on your new purchase. We all know accidents happen, and it seems that Murphy’s Law (if it can happen, it will) most directly corresponds to the best animals in the herd. I would anticipate that if you brought in a new young bull, he’s probably going to be one of your better prospects, and the small insurance premium (usually 6% of purchase price) is worth the peace of mind it brings that you are financially covered if the new guy does the unthinkable during his first breeding season. If at all possible, freezing a collection of semen to store can be viewed as an ”insurance policy” that the bull’s genetic power isn’t totally lost if he isn’t walking the pastures.

It’s important to remember if you bought a yearling bull, you bought the bovine equivalent of a teenage boy. They are still growing and developing, and they need the nutrition to help them reach peak physical maturity. Getting a bull into the right shape for breeding season might require losing some extra sale day condition before turnout. Going from a sale prep ration to breeding cows out on pasture could be a bit of a shock to the system if you don’t help your bull transition to that exclusively forage diet.

Whatever your usual herd health protocol includes, it’s important to get your bull on the same program as the rest of the herd as soon as you can. Visit with the seller of the bull to see what measures they may have taken for herd health while he was still in their care. Proper vaccinations, pour on, and even fly control can be important to keeping your bull in the best of shape during the summer working months.

Before turnout, check to make sure that the proper DNA work has been done on your new bull. With the ruling passed by the ASA Board of Directors in 2022, any bull that you buy born on or after January 1, 2022 will need to be 100K genomic tested with ASA in order to register his progeny. You can log in to Digital Beef to see if he has been tested by the seller before you take possession. If his EPDs are highlighted in yellow, you are good to go. If not, you need to grab a DNA sample while he is still around the barn and it is handy to get.

In most cases, the seller of the bull will guarantee you that he will pass a breeding soundness exam (BSE). If the bull has not had a BSE at the time you purchase him, it is absolutely vital to have your veterinarian perform one before you turn him out. Catching the problem of an infertile bull is infinitely better when caught before turnout instead of when a chunk of your cows come back open. Most sellers will do everything they can to make the deal right if your new bull does pass a BSE and isn’t deemed fit to breed cows. It’s something you never want to have to discuss, but make sure you and the seller are clear on expectations from both sides if the bull isn’t a breeder. Refunds, sale credits, or replacement bulls are all ways I have seen this handled. Both sides need to be ok with whatever arrangement is struck.

Now that you’ve got him insured, fed right, as healthy as can be, and certified to be fertile, it’s time to put the new guy to work. It’s important to not put too much workload on your young bull in his first breeding season. Sometimes we forget that young bulls aren’t machines. They are being asked to grow, mature, and breed cows all at once, making it a tough stage of life. The old adage is that a young bull can handle one cow per one month of his age. If you are using him in a cleanup situation behind a round of AI, you can probably increase this number a little bit, provided you are getting decent conception rates with artificial insemination.

The perfect recipe for disaster when you bring home a new, young herd bull is to drive him to the pasture, open the gate, and kick him out with 40 cows and wish him well. You take proper care of the other major investments around your farm (tractors, pickups, hay balers). Your bull should be no exception, as he is a major investment in the future of your genetics. Taking the extra steps early on in his development can make the difference between sending your bull to town after one or two breeding seasons or having him properly developed to still walk the pastures at a ripe old age.

written by Matt Woolfolk, ASA Director of Performance Programs

2023 Interns

Welcome to our 2023 American Shorthorn Association Interns. We are looking forward to their arrival in May!

Jana Owen is a junior at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, where she is majoring in Animal Science and minoring in Agricultural Communications. Jana grew up on her family’s Shorthorn farm in southern middle Tennessee. As an alumna of both 4-H and FFA, she enjoyed exhibiting cattle and goats and competing in multiple judging, quiz bowl, speech, and portfolio competitions. At UT, she loves staying plugged in with the agriculture industry through organizations like Block and Bridle, TN Ag Communicators of Tomorrow, Dairy Club, Livestock Judging Team, and Collegiate 4-H & FFA, where she serves as Vice President. Outside of these activities, she enjoys going to church, UT games, concerts, and thrift stores. Jana is passionate about the Shorthorn breed and is ecstatic to learn more about the association this summer!

Kaylee McInvale is currently a senior at Tarleton State University pursuing a degree in Animal Science and a minor in Agricultural economics. Kaylee wants to pursue a master’s and take a path into animal nutrition or reproduction. She is very active on campus as she is a Tarleton State Block and Bridle club member. She serves as the scholarship chair for the Alpha Zeta chapter of the Sigma Alpha Sorority. As well as she is currently serving as a Residential Leader for the Tarleton Housing Department. Kaylee has been raising and showing livestock all her life. She has raised Chianinas, Simmentals, and Herefords. She has helped her parents run cow operations like Circle M Farms and Foster Brothers Farm, registered Simmental and Angus farms. Kaylee served in various positions as a Texas State Junior Director for both Horn and Polled Associations. She was in various royalty roles for the Polled Association. Kaylee served as the 2020-2021 National Hereford Queen, leading her to where she is today. She is currently serving on the National Junior Hereford Board of Directors. She was elected to the board this past summer. Kaylee is looking forward to meeting and working with all of you this summer. Kaylee will be serving as our Junior Activities Intern.

Anna Bonnet is a junior agriculture media and communications major at West Texas A&M University. She is from Karnes City, TX where she grew up helping her family on their Brangus cattle ranch and showing cattle for many years. Throughout college she has had the opportunity to intern for several national livestock shows, growing her passion for the stock show and cattle industries. Anna is very excited to be joining us in Kansas City for the summer as the communications intern.