At the Starting Gate

Written by: Matt Woolfolk, ASA Director of Performance Programs

When I am struggling to come up with a topic for this column like I was this month, I usually look at the previous month’s article (to make sure I don’t copy it again) and the article from the same month in the previous year; hoping for a topic that was relevant the previous year. My September 2018 article opened with, “To be honest with you, I had a hard time coming up with something to write about for this issue.” I was successful in discovering a pattern: that the September issue is a common time for writer’s block! The best way for me to get rolling in these cases is to start writing what’s on my mind and hope I can tie it back to cattle eventually. That method worked out well for this month.

I spent an August weekend in Des Moines with friends at the Prairie Meadows racetrack. It was a fun way to wrap up the summer before heading into the chaos that is fall sale and show season. With everyone on the trip working in purebred cattle marketing, we resigned ourselves to the fact that we won’t be able to get together again until Denver. If you invite someone in our line of work to a social event on a fall weekend, don’t expect them to show up unless it’s your sale day!

Horse racing is affectionately known as “The Sport of Kings”, but I’m not sure that moniker really fits. Some of you tune in for the Kentucky Derby or other big races and see the high-class party atmosphere, but you may not realize that everyday horse racing is a blue-collar profession. The barns at Prairie Meadows are full of horsemen trying to make their living winning races. While we all tried to find the next longshot winner, the conversation at the table turned to cattle.

One of the guys at the table made the observation, ‘You know, this sport deals with a lot of the same things that we do in the cattle business.” What followed was a lengthy discussion about some of the similarities in horse racing and the beef cattle business. I’ve outlined some of the biggest commonalities in the rest of this article.

Breeding and Genetics: Breeding racehorses is a combination of art, livestock breeding and luck. What makes the Thoroughbred breeding industry much more challenging, is that all matings must be natural service in order to be eligible for registration. Imagine if we had that restriction in the registered beef business! Most of the Thoroughbred breeding in the US is based around Lexington, Kentucky. However, many state Thoroughbred organizations offer special races and incentive programs for horses bred and raced in their state. We watched several races which were open only to Iowa-bred horses while at Prairie Meadows, and they even host a special day of racing to celebrate the Iowa-breds at the end of the season. Similar to our livelihood, it’s important to find a niche for your breeding program where you can fit and be successful.


Conformation: I’m not an expert in racehorse phenotype, but one of my friends has some knowledge of what one should look like. He certainly had a “look” or type that he was studying
for when the horses paraded out onto the track before each race. It didn’t necessarily help him cash any winning tickets. I think as cattlemen we have a better grasp on what type of animal will be a winner in our herds than the horseplayer at the track.


Statistics and Data: Open up a race program and you will find more data than you know what to do with on each race. There are statistics on jockey and trainer performance, as well as recaps of recent past races for every horse in the race. To a novice, it can be a numerical overload, but it can also helpful to find the winning horse and place the right wager. Much akin to our own performance data, EPDs and selection indexes, the information in a racing program can be beneficial if you know how to use it!

Betting Style: Everyone at the track has their own methodology to picking a winner. Some watch the horses in the paddock, while others study the stats in the program. Some play by gut feeling or color of the horse. Regardless, the destination is the same for everyone: to win some money! Study all the different cattle operations out there and you’ll see a similar trend. No two cattlemen go about things exactly the same, even with the same end goal in mind.

Compassion: The crowds are not very big at Prairie Meadows, except for the 10 minutes before and during a race. The spectator numbers grow then because all the people who work in the stables make their way over to watch their horses run their race. Grooms, trainers, and other staff all gather near the finish line to cheer on their horses. You can tell that they care deeply for the animals they are responsible for. As soon as every race ended, they bounced into action to cool their horse down and get them back to the barn for post-race care. What may just be “the #5 horse” to the racegoer is a special athlete with a name and a unique personality to the people who care for them, just like we view some of our cow herds.

Horse racing has always been one of my favorite sports. After the trip to Prairie Meadows and the discussion of how similar it is to our beloved industry, I think I’ve developed an even deeper appreciation for their business. Midwestern horsemen and cattlemen are a lot more alike than we might think, with both groups made up of dedicated, hard-working people trying to make a living in the industry they love. You also have to be a pretty good gambler to make it in either business.

Interns Final Days

Our time here at the American Shorthorn Association has flown by and we’re sad to say goodbye, but so grateful for our time we have been in the office. We have all learned many new skills and are so happy to have had this adventure. Working in a breed association and the agricultural industry has allowed us real life experience and has given us a taste of future career possibilities. Although we all come from a different breed, the Shorthorn breed is something special to us now.

To say goodbye to the staff, we had a little potluck to celebrate our internship before we finished our final days. We took our favorite recipe from the NJSS beef-cook off contest and prepared it for the office as the main dish. We made grilled steak taco’s with poblano-mango salsa. Our apartment doesn’t have a grilled, so we improvised and cooked them stove top. After cooking, we cut them into bit size chunks that were great size to put in tortillas. We had all the “fixings” to build your own taco and the other staff made side dishes and desserts. We had an array of Mexican dishes that went along with the tacos perfectly. It was a great time to enjoy the company of the office. Below you can find the recipe for the steak taco’s!

As we say goodbye to the office, we would like to thank the staff for putting up with us and providing such a fun and enjoyable work atmosphere. As we part ways, Wade and Wyatt will head back to finish their senior year of college and Faith will move home and continue her search for her dream job. We thank the ASA and their members for having such an amazing association and wish you the best of luck in your future as you continue to build the success of the Shorthorn breed.

 

Grilled Steak Tacos with Poblano Mango Salsa

Ingredients:

1 pound of boneless steak

2 medium poblano peppers

1 medium onion, cut into 1/2” thick slices

2 cloves garlic – minced

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 medium mango

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

1/4 cup fresh lime juice

8 small corn tortillas (6-7 inch diameter)

Fresh Cilantro Sprigs & lime wedges (optional)

Instructions:

1) Grill peppers and onions over medium heat for 10 to 15 minutes, or until tender, set aside

2) Combine cumin and garlic, press onto steaks. Place steak on grill over medium heat, cook for 8-13 minutes.

3) Remove and discard skins, stems and seeds from peppers when Coll enough to handle. Chop peppers and onions. Combine veggies, mango, chopped cilantro, lime juice and salt in a medium bowl. Set aside.

4) Place Tortillas on grill. Grill for 30 seconds or until heated through and browned lightly.

5) Carve steak and season with additional salt. Top tortillas with equal amounts of beef and mango salsa. Garnish with cilantro sprigs and lime wedges, if desired.

CA State Fair Super Regional Results

On Thursday July 18, 2019 Shorthorn enthusiast exhibited at the California State Fair open show.  The Open Shorthorn Show was judged by Brent Murphy of Houstonia, MO.  Murphy evaluated 33 purebred females and 15 purebred bulls.

 

Grand Champion Bull honor went to GSC Gold Label 2585, owned by Greg Cardey of Turlock, CA.

JSF Polaris 201F was named Reserve Grand Champion Bull, owned by Sadie Faith Plummer of Herald, CA.

Grand Champion Female was awarded to KRLE Myrtle Bo Juliet 814 ET, owned by Aaron Kerlee of Denair, CA.

Reserve Grand Champion Female was B/F Pretty Girl 8053, owned by Matt & Stacey Bigelow of O’Neals, CA.

Other Champions include:

Open Purebred Female Show Divisions:

Spring Heifer Calf Champion

  • Sunny Day FB Countess 4G, Alpha & Sherri Gipe, Merced, CA.

Spring Heifer Calf Reserve Champion

  • LC Augusta Pat 3280, Don Cardey, Turlock, CA.

Junior Heifer Calf Champion

  • LC Funny Face 3192, Don Cardey.

Junior Heifer Calf Reserve Champion

  • LC Funny Face 3197, Don Cardy.

Senior Heifer Calf Champion

  • B/F Pretty Girl 8053, Matt & Stacey Bigelow.

Senior Heifer Calf Reserve Champion

  • B/F Cherokee Lady 8121, Matt & Stacey Bigelow.

Intermediate Champion Female

  • KRLE Myrtle Bo Juliet 814 ET, Aaron Kerlee.

 

Reserve Intermediate Champion Female

  • LC Catherine 2883, Don Cardey.

Junior Champion Female

  • Sunny Day Homestead Foxxy 20F, Dennis Pluth, Clearlake Oaks, CA.

Reserve Junior Champion Female

  • Sunny Day FB Suzy 8F, Timothy Whitfield, Merced, CA.

Senior Champion Female

  • B/F Mary 7042, Matt & Stacey Bigelow.

Reserve Senior Champion Female

  • AFR Shannon BB F05, Albiani Shorthorns, Elk Grove, CA.

Cow/Calf Pair Champion

  • JP-JP Bar SULL Wild Rose, Juston Plummer, Herald, CA.

Reserve Champion Cow/Calf Pair

  • Sunny Day GT Countess 18D, Alpha & Sherri Gipe.

Open Purebred Bull Show Divisions:

Spring Bull Calf Champion

  • GSC Gold Label 3283, Greg Cardey.

Spring Bull Calf Reserve Champion

  • JT Jake Sensation 192, Jared Tanaka, Vacaville, CA.

Junior Bull Calf Champion

  • LC Studer 3219, Don Cardey.

Junior Bull Calf Reserve Champion

  • JT Studer 3189, JT Ranch, Turlock, CA.

Senior Bull Calf Champion

  • JT Studer 2987, JT Ranch.

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion

  • GSC Studer 3041, Greg Cardey.

Intermediate Champion Bull

  • GSC Studer 2946, Greg Cardey.

Reserve Intermediate Champion Bull

  • LC Studer 2869, Don Cardey.

Junior Champion Bull

  • JSF Polaris 201F, Sadie Faith Plummer.

Reserve Junior Champion Bull

  • LC Gold Label 2685, Don Cardey.

Senior Champion Bull

  • GSC Gold Label 2585, Greg Cardey.

Reserve Senior Champion Bull

  • LC Studer 2563, Don Cardey.

Interns Remarks from working at ASA

As the intern’s time slowly comes to an end, they looked back on our time here with ASA and want to give our thanks and remarks of this internship.

Wyatt

My time at the American Shorthorn Association has been nothing but remarkable. Taking on this position as the Communication Intern for the summer has been very rewarding. I have accomplished various career development skills and I am so grateful for all that I have learned. I can honestly say that this job has taught me many things that you can’t learn in a classroom. The staff at ASA is truly amazing and I am so glad I had the opportunity to work and get know to each of them. (Even though I might have annoyed them by playing my music too loud and sometimes bickering with the other interns about silly stuff.) I am also grateful for the networking and relationships I have built through this internship and really appreciate all the support and friendly conversations I’ve had with members, volunteers, and youth of this association. The people involved in this association were my favorite part of this internship and truly made my time here worth it. I hope the best for this association and anyone involved in it and hope to keep in contact in the future. Enjoy the rest of your summer and good luck with your involvement with ASA!

 

Faith

My time here with the American Shorthorn Association has been one of the most beneficial times. I will miss everyone in the office as my time ends. I enjoyed getting to work on tasks for junior nationals and loved the chance to help the youth here. This internship gave me a chance to work and develop more than just computer skills and I will be grateful for the things that I learned here as the Registration Intern. I think it is safe to say that I have learned, developed great friendships, and made many acquaintances that I hope to see develop into friendships later. Thank you to the other interns Wade and Wyatt Minihan for working with me and to Shelby for putting up with us this summer. Can’t wait to see where the American Shorthorn Association goes in the future!

 

Wade

Although my time at the American Shorthorn Association has been short, it has been great. From the first day, the staff has been nothing but welcoming and helpful. Through this internship, I have learned so much, met many new faces, and have a gained numerous skill that I will be able to take with me, as I continue on down the road in life. I very much enjoyed preparing all the contest materials for junior nationals and hope I was able to leave an impact on those junior members. I would like to thank all the staff, and volunteers that helped pull of a successful junior national. You never realize all the work and dedication that is put into a show, until you’re in those shoes. I’m walking away from this internship feeling blessed and honored to have been able to serve as the Youth Activities Internship this summer. A special thanks to Shelby Rogers, Wyatt Minihan and Faith Massingill for all their time and dedication they put in at the ASA. The Shorthorn breed is growing and look forward to watching the breeds growth and development in the years to come.

 

Thank you from all of us for welcoming us into the family-friendly breed. We are sad the summer is over but look forward to seeing everyone down the road!

College Insight from the Interns

  1. Preparation
  • Start as a high school freshman and keep track of all involvement through clubs, organizations, associations, sports, youth groups, volunteering, awards, etc. This will make filling out applications less stressful. Also, apply for as many scholarships as you can!
  • Research the different universities of interest, make a campus visit and then pick your best fit.
  1. Live in the Dorms
  • This is a great way to meet friends and give you the true “college experience.” It also makes for some great stories to tell down the road.

Below are a few stories from the interns days in the dorms.

Wyatt– My roommate and I did not get along very well, and he made living with him very difficult. I finally had enough and put laxative in his workout powders. Although this is not something I would ever do again, it does get a laugh out of most people!

Faith– One time my roommates boyfriend branded himself and came over to our room for medical attention. Let’s just say the scar is fairly ugly and it wasn’t his best decision but it’s a memory that we will all share till we go to the grave.

Wade– My friend and I would have weekly movie parties and would leave the door to my room open so other people could join. One time we ended up with 25 people in my room although by dorm rules we were only allowed to have 10 people in a room at a time.

  1. Check and make sure that the college credits you have taken in high school will transfer to your university. Talk to your advisor & see how you can make them all work.
  2. Get involved!
  • Have an open mind and don’t be afraid to go out of your comfort zone. Whether its high school or college don’t hold yourself back in fear. Life is too short to not venture out and try new things.
  1. Distance makes the heart grow fonder.
  • Although you might think your parents and siblings are the worst thing ever, moving away will make you realize that they aren’t all that bad. You may not always agree with them but your time away will help you to appreciate them and value them. Also, you’ll be calling your parents often(they know more than you would like to admit)
  1. Take a fun class!
  • These sometimes turn out to be the best part of college. You’ll meet new people and develop new fun skills all while having a good time! Yes, it’s going to cost a little money, but you can only use the young and irresponsible card for so many years!
  1. Get to know your professors
  • Especially the professors in you major. They will be tremendous help in your education and career development.
  1. Make a packing list and do some research
  • Every college is different, and some may require more packing than others. What kind of clothes are you going to need? Does your dorm come with a fridge and/or microwave? What movies help you get over homesickness? This is a time where overpacking should be a priority. Below are a few items that the interns were very glad they packed.
  1. Dorm size vacuum (‘Dirt Devil’ from amazon)
  2. Iron and Ironing Board (you or someone on your floor will need this sometime)
  3. Pillows and favorite blanket/s (this is a great reminder of home)
  4. Air mattress (you will have visitors)
  5. Plates and silverware (you will be eating in your room often)
  6. Take your time
  • Enjoy your time at college and take it at your own pace. There is no shame in taking extra time or graduating early. Your main focus should be getting an education that has prepared you enough for the work force.
  1. Internships!
  • Internships are important in so many ways. They give you real life work experience and sometimes can be the make or break factor in realizing if your major is the right fit for you. They’re also great for networking and meeting new people-you never know who your boss/supervisor will know and they could be very helpful in your career down the road.

Interns View on NJSS

As we unpack and recover from the busy and fun week in Lebanon, Tennessee, the interns wanted to give our views on NJSS.

Wyatt

Attending Shorthorn Junior Nationals was a different experience for myself in many ways. It was rewarding to see all the hard work come together. This great week of fun made memories for the youth and their families. Although, I am used to attending Hereford Junior Nationals, the dedication and passion the youth have for the Shorthorn breed is similar and was rewarding to encounter. I was able to spend most of my time capturing photos of the exhibitors and their animals. I know the time and dedication it takes and it’s fulfilling to be able to capture their success through a lens. Be sure to check out the AJSA Facebook page in the next few days for all the photos I captured at the 2019 NJSS in Lebanon, Tennessee.

Faith

Wow! Junior Nationals is done and it’s hard to believe that it is already over. I had such a great time getting to meet the juniors and parents involved with the Shorthorn association. Overall, this was one of my favorite shows to attend and work as an intern. I had fun helping wherever I was needed and hope the juniors had a blast at the 2019 NJSS in Tennessee. Congratulations to everyone who participated in Lebanon, I wish you luck for the upcoming show season. Get out there and show off the great breed of Shorthorns!

Wade

NJSS was a different experience for me, as I grew up going to Hereford Junior Nationals. As the youth activities intern, I had the opportunity to prepare all the contests, scripts, organize awards and help with many other tasks. Until you are actually in those shoes, you never realize all the work behind the scenes to make a junior national successful. I have a new-found respect for all those hard-working individuals who help make a show happen without any major issues. I really enjoyed all the task my internship gave this year. While in Lebanon, Tennessee I was able to match a name to a face at the end of the week and look forward to seeing those familiar face at other shows. The Shorthorn breed, as a whole, welcomed us with smiling faces and great personalities. Overall, the NJSS was an awesome experience and, although I may be a Hereford kid, look out for me at future Shorthorn Junior Nationals.

Top 15 Show Essentials that often get forgotten- Don’t forget these!

As we pack and get ready to leave for the National Junior Shorthorn Show, we thought it would be a good idea to put together a list of items that often get forgotten. Below is the Top 15 items that we have forgotten and we don’t want you to make the same mistake!

  1. Show Stick
  • This may seem like a “no duh,” but we can’t name the amount of times that we had to borrow a show stick.
  1. Extra Socks and Shoes
  • You don’t want wet shoes all day after washing!
  1. Registration Papers & Health Papers
  1. Speakers/Headphones
  • Who doesn’t love some good tunes at a show?! But remember your surrounding and your audience, you’re a role model for your fellow members.
  1. Favorite Food/Snacks
  • Although fair and concession food is delicious, it can get tiring after a few days. Make sure to bring some of your favorite snacks! Below is a couple of our favorite food while attending shows!

Wyatt: crockpot cheesy potatoes, cake cookies, and hobo sandwiches

Faith: Chips, summer sausage & cheese, and sweet tea

Wade: crockpot breakfast burritos, peanut butter cornflake bars, and cinnamon rolls

  1. Lawn Chairs, Coolers, & Crockpots
  • Lawn chair for naps, cooler for drinks and food, and crockpots for cooking.
  1. Contest materials
  1. Boots
  • You don’t want to show in your barn shoes.
  1. Favorite Starched Show Jeans
  • You also don’t want to show in your barn jeans.
  1. Revive, Hocus Pocus, Tall Adhesive, & Paint
  • Although you can buy these at many shows, it’s easy to spend some big bucks if you forget these.
  1. Clippers
  • These are crucial in preparation for the showring.
  1. Extensions Cords
  • Clipper and blower cords are only so long….
  1. Wash Bucket, water hose, and foamer
  • You ever tried washing an animal without these? Good luck.
  1. Fans
  • Remember, “No Butt Fans in the Barn.” But they are allowed in tie outs
  1. Show Halters
  • It happens to everyone, double check before you leave!

We are 3 DAYS from Junior Nationals! We can’t wait to see you all in Tennessee!

Further Thoughts on the 2017 National Sire Test

In the February issue, there was a Performance Review from the 2017 ASA National Sire Test (NST) at the University of Illinois highlighting what we gathered from the data on the first set of Shorthorn-sired calves to go through the NST program. The first round of the NST created some positive energy among breeders who are interested in performance testing and using data in their breeding programs. With this project, a lot of data was collected that is either new to the industry or hasn’t been as prevalent in the Shorthorn database. There have been some questions as to what data is the most important or should be emphasized by Shorthorn breeders. I don’t think there is a single correct answer to that, but I certainly have an opinion on what I think is important to consider as a breeder, as well as the Shorthorn breed as a whole. Read more of Matt’s article here.

Welcome 2019 Interns!!

Faith Massingill is a senior at West Texas A&M University majoring in Agriculture Media and Communication. She grew up in a small town called, Hamilton, Texas, where she raised both Purebred Angus and Red Angus cattle with her family. She was very active in 4-H and FFA, competing in every contest possible which all led to her finding her passion. At school, Faith is heavily involved with the Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow serving as an officer as well as an Ag Ambassador for the Department of Agriculture. She hopes to find herself working for the cattle industry one day as she continues to pursue her passion for advocating the agriculture industry. Faith can’t wait to meet everyone and get to work with the American Shorthorn Association!

 

Wade Minihan grew up on a commercial cow operation, as well as a Registered Hereford operation in Wheaton, KS. The operation is managed by his parents, alongwith his older brother, twin brother, and younger sister. Wade is currently attending Fort Hays State University in Hays, KS pursuing a bachelor’s degree in agribusiness, with a minor in marketing. Involvement on the collegiate level consists of Vice-President of Block and Bridle on the campus of Fort Hays State University. In addition, he serves as a senator with the Student Government Association and he is a junior board member of the Kansas Junior Hereford Association. Wade has been showing cattle for the past 14 years at the county, state, and national level. Wade has a passion instilled in the cattle industry and for the next generation of the livestock industry. He strives to be a role model for the younger generation, as they are the boots on the ground representation that is to come. Wade believes there is no better achievement than having the ability to assist and motivate the youth of this industry that we are all passionate about. He is excited to be the youth activities intern for ASA this summer!

 

 

Wyatt Minihan is currently a junior at Kansas State University majoring in Agriculture Communications and Journalism. Wyatt grew up in the small town of Wheaton, KS where his family owned and operated a commercial, cow-calf operation while also raising and showing registered, Hereford cattle. Growing up in the rural community sparked his ambition to become an advocate for the agricultural industry. While attending K-State, Wyatt has been involved in many clubs and campus activities including the Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow and Block and Bridle. Wyatt plans to use his interest in photography, graphic design, and passion for agriculture in his future to better serve the agricultural industry. Wyatt is looking forward to serving as your communications intern for the AJSA and learning more about the beef industry and this association.

2018-2019 National & Regional Show Winners

See the 2018-2019 Show Region Winners below. The detailed report will be in the May/June issue of Shorthorn Country.

 

National Shorthorn Show Female of the Year: Steck Chelsie C 704 ET, Riley Johnson, Jackson, MN.

National Shorthorn Show Bull of the Year: TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

National ShorthornPlus Show Female of the Year: SULL Black Cherri 7217E ET, Jake Brandt, Clarion, IA.

National ShorthornPlus Show Bull of the Year: CCF Nicholas C59E, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

 

Northeast Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: CF V8 Mona Lisa Reward 782 SOL ET, Ryan Wickard, Wilkinson, IN.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: Midnight Madison 716, Annette Braun, Mechanicsville, MD.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- HAA Fantasies Halo ET, Todd DeGasperi

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- SULL Myrtle 7655E ET, April Troyer

Senior Heifer Calf Reserve Champion- M&L Misty’s Deception 1217, Landon Helmke

Intermediate Champion Female- Midnight Madison 716. Annette Braun

Intermediate Reserve Champion Female- Don Amber 520 ET, April Troyer

Junior Champion Female- CF V8 Mona Lisa Reward SOL ET, Ryan Wickard

Junior Reserve Champion Female- Armstron Queen 1704 ET, Benjamin Allen

Senior Champion Female- SULL Rose’s Legacy 7102E ET, Kolten DeGasperi

Senior Reserve Champion Female- SS Ocean Mirage 714 ET, Marsch Show Cattle

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV, Saxonburg, PA.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up- GLF Spirit Fusion, Henry Dodrer, Jr., Westminster, MD.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Senior Bull Calf Champion- GLF Spirit Fusion, Henry Dodrer, Jr.

Junior Champion Bull- MVF Hot Rod, Masonic Village Farm

Senior Champion Bull- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- HAA Ebony, Kolten DeGasperi, Westminster, MD.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- Burgess Red Ivy 27017 ET, Annette Braun, Mechanicsville, MD.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Junior Champion Female- HAA Ebony, Kolten DeGasperi

Junior Reserve Champion Female- Burgess Red Ivy 27017 ET, Annette Braun

 

ShorthornPlus Bull of the Year- Harmony White Storm, Annette Braun, Mechanicsville, MD.

Junior Bull Calf Champion- Harmony White Storm, Annette Braun

 

 

Southeast Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: GCC Evolution Charm 7102 ET, Kolten Greenhorn, Bellbrook, OH.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: RFSS Roan Margie ET, Evea Ennis, Martinsville, IN.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- CF TF No Foolin 897 UR X ET, Camryn Clapp

Early Spring Heifer Calf Res. Champion- Bratcher Myrtle Bo 812 ET, Craig Bratcher

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- GAF Miss Sassy 2518, Jake Ozburn

Junior Heifer Calf Reserve Champion- Martindell Dreams 801, Austin Martin

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- Martindell Lily 787, Austin Martin

Intermediate Champion Female- GCC Evolution Charm 7102 ET, Kolten Greenhorn

Intermediate Reserve Champion Female- RFSS Roan Margie ET, Evea Ennis

Junior Champion Female- VSC Fancy Margie 60, Mitch Williams

Senior Champion Female- RFSS Roan Sis, Mattie Williams

Senior Reserve Champion Female- VSC Destiny Best Asset 57, Molly Williams

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year- EGL Neptune MX 759, Evea Ennis, Martinsville, IN.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV, Saxonburg, PA.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- VVCC Rocky, Valley Vista Farms

Early Spring Bull Calf Res. Champion- DFF Revolution, Lanie Sutherland

Junior Bull Calf Champion- White Lightning 21MV ET, Cheyenne Cattle Company

Senior Bull Calf Champion- EGL Neptune MX 759, Evea Ennis

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- MFK Last Dance 387K X, Maurice & Faye Korthaus

Intermediate Champion Bull- VCC Ain’t No Foolin’ 1701 ET, Vollborn Cattle Company & Cedar Lane Farm

Senior Champion Bull- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV

Senior Reserve Champion Bull- MFK Hot Rebel 26K X, Wesley Maurice Korthaus

 

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- 4D Mae Lynn D21E, Rachel Drumm, Winchester, KY.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- Martindell Lily 839, Austin Martin, Tompkinsville, KY.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- Martindell Lily 839, Austin Martin

Intermediate Champion Female- Circle J Mabel 005E, Austin Martin

Junior Champion Female- SharBen Lil Miss Can’t Be Wrong, Adymae Williams

Senior Champion Female- 4D Mae Lynn D21E, Rachel Drumm

 

North Central Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: DSF Esther 4F, Nathan Studer & Jenny Sruder, Creston, IA.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: Bergs Sweet Katie, Madeline Berg, Osage, IA.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- DVW 24 Roses 318, Wasinger Cattle Company

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- DSF Esther 4F, Nathan Studer & Jenny Studer

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- Bergs Crystal’s Sally, Lauren Berg

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- Homedale June Rosewood 7806, Samantha Jo Jabs

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- Homedale June Rosewood 7789, Lane Thomas Jabs

Intermediate Champion Female- Bergs Sweet Katie, Madeline Berg

Intermediate Res. Champion Female- Homedale MLS Max Rosa 7790, Elizabeth Jabs

Junior Champion Female- DSF Missie 104E, Rose Family

Senior Champion Female- DSF Sonya 11E, Brock David Studer

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: JS Continental Divide, Blake Lehman, Eureka, IL & James R. Johnson, Niantic, IL.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: 6B’s Guardian ET, 6B Farms, Allison, IA.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- Bergs Red Duke, Madeline Berg

Early Spring Bull Calf Res. Champion- Studer’s Forsyth 65F. Nathan Studer & Jenny Studer

Junior Bull Calf Champion- Studer’s Fairgame 6F, Brock David Studer

Junior Champion Bull- JS Continental Divide, Blake Lehman & James R. Johnson

Senior Champion Bull- 6B’s Guardian ET, 6B Farms

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- SULL Black Cherri 7217E ET, Jake Brandt, Clarion, IA.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- WGR Midnight Mirgage 708E, Mikayla Wetzel, Faribault, MN.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- 6B Nan 18, 6B Farms

Intermediate Champion Female- WGR Midnight Mirgage 708E, Mikayla Wetzel

Junior Champion Female- SULL Black Cherri 7217E ET, Jake Brandt

 

South Central Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: SULL Lucy 7686E ET, Dayson Cash, Fay, OK.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: RSF Simply Dessert Rose 3E, Ryan Lane, Siloam Springs, AR.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Late Spring Heifer Calf Champion- 2GS Cumberland 523F, Garrison Spooner

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- M&E Mary’s Cumberland 952, M & E Shorthorns

Early Spring Heifer Calf Res. Champion- JVCC Miss Margie, Luke Jones

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- LDB Magic Rain 801 ET, Brittany Blankinship

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- M&E Cumberland 948, M & E Shorthorns

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- SULL Lucy 7686E ET, Dayson Cash

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- WHR Queen of Sonny 7N15 ET, Carolyn Norris

Intermediate Champion Female- RSF Simply Dessert Rose 3E, Ryan Lane

Intermediate Res. Champion Female- AF Lassies Rose 1725, Merideth Behrens

Junior Champion Female- Simple Brilliance, Lane Blankinship

Junior Res. Champion Female- LH Dee Licious 0317, L H Show Cattle

Senior Champion Female- DTR Mona Lisa 701E, Josie Heter

Senior Res. Champion Female- TRN Foxxy 687 ET, Graham Spooner

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: Fieser’s Mr. Impact 517, Dayson Cash, Fay, OK & Fieser’s Polled Shorthorns, Plains, KS.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- DCL Margie’s Swagger, Dayson Cash

Junior Bull Calf Champion- J&M Maxim Silver ET, J & M Shorthorns

Senior Bull Calf Champion- Fieser’s Ranger, Cash-Farms Shorthorns

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- K’s Zepplin 717, L H Show Cattle

Intermediate Champion Bull- Fieser’s Rookie, Cash-Farms Shorthorns

Junior Champion Bull- Fieser’s Mr. Impact 517, Dayson Cash & Fieser’s Polled Shorthorns

Senior Champion Bull- TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms

 

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year: JVCC Red Diamond 701, Kadin Kinder Worthington, El Reno, OK.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up: Miss Star Knite, Kadin Kinder Worthington, El Reno, OK.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf- Ms. Annie, Ashlyn Larman

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- LDB Cowgirl’s Phoebe 805, Lane Blankinship

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- CCF Violet C01F, Buck Downum

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- AJC Classy Stella, AJ Show Cattle

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- LDB Reckless Mulan 803, Lane Blankinship

Intermediate Champion Female- Miss Star Knite, Kadin Kinder Worthington

Intermediate Res. Champion Female- DTR Ruby Rock Candy 758E, Josie Heter

Junior Champion Female- JVCC Red Diamond 701, Kadin Kinder Worthington

Junior Res. Champion Female- Ms. Laney, Ashlyn Larman

Senior Champion Female- CCR Pepper, Madyson Nunn

 

ShorthornPlus Bull of the Year: CCF Nicholas C59E, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

ShorthornPlus Bull Runner-Up (TIE): FSC Mr. Fireball, Brett Forgy, Caddo, OK

CRC Little Boy Blue 12D, TSW Cattle, Marlow, OK

 

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- FSC Mr. Fireball, Brett Forgy

Junior Bull Calf Champion- CCF Paxton C14F, Crow Creek Farms

Senior Bull Calf Champion- CCF Nicholas C59E, Crow Creek Farms

Senior Champion Bull- CRC Little Boy Blue 12D, TSW Cattle

 

 

West Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: LC Augusta Pat 2728, Catherine Heather, Sanger, CA

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: LC Augusta Pat 2817, Don Cardey, Turlock, CA

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- LC Augusta Pat 2817, Don Cardey

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- LC Augusta Pat 2728, Catherine Heather

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- LC Welcome Lady 2704, Don Cardey

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- JT Betty Angel 2564, J T Ranch

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- LC Augusta Pat 2667, Don Cardey

Intermediate Champion Female- GSC Rosie Ransom 2503, Greg Cardey

Intermediate Reserve Champion Female- JT Betty Angel 2472, J T Ranch

Junior Champion Female- LC Augusta Pat 2385, Don Cardey

Junior Reserve Champion Female- JT Betty Angel 2334, J T Ranch

Senior Champion Female- GSC Princess 2222, Greg Cardey

Senior Reserve Champion Female- LC Funny Face 2300, Don Cardey

Cow/Calf Champion- GSC Sweetheart 1311, Greg Cardey

Reserve Cow/Calf Champion- LC Augusta Pat 1383, Don Cardey

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: GSC Studer 2259, Greg Cardey, Turlock, CA.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: GSC Gold Label 2148, Greg Cardey, Turlock, CA.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- GSC Studer 2865, Greg Cardey

Junior Bull Calf Champion- LC Gold Label 2685, Don Cardey

Junior Bull Calf Res. Champion- JT Studer 2725, J T Ranch

Senior Bull Calf Champion- GSC Gold Label 2585, Greg Cardey

Senior Bull Calf Res. Champion- LC Studer 2563, Don Cardey

Intermediate Champion Bull- LC Studer 2464, Don Cardey

Intermediate Res. Champion Bull- GSC Studer 2419, Greg Cardey

Junior Champion Bull- GSC Studer 2259, Greg Cardey

Junior Reserve Champion Bull- LC Gold Label 2263, Don Cardey

Senior Champion Bull- GSC Gold Label 2148, Greg Cardey

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year: PHF Idaho Duchess 294E, Arielle Phillips, Caldwell, ID

Intermediate Champion Female- PHF Idaho Duchess 294E, Arielle Phillips