New Shorthorn EPDs Now Available

The much anticipated IGS Single-Step Genetic Evaluation powered by BOLT is finally here! You can find the new single-step EPDs in DigitalBeef. Going forward, we plan to upload new EPDs on Mondays at noon Central time.

We hope you take the time to review the new EPDs to get a grasp on how the new run might differ from previous evaluations. Please realize that just like the implementation of any new program in any business, there are likely to be some minor issues that will need to be resolved. The IGS team has spent months and countless man hours to make this new genetic evaluation system as strong as possible, and even this team of elite scientists will experience some hiccups.

Please take notice that breed averages have changed and some of the traits in our EPD lineup will look different.  We have resources available to help with some of the questions you may have with the new system. We will circulate these resources via the ASA website, Insider e-newsletter, social media, and the Shorthorn Country. As a starting point, please reference the March and April Shorthorn Country issues for articles discussing some of the FAQ associated with the new single-step EPDs.

We have reviewed the new EPDs for several hundred of the breed’s leading sires by registrations to get an overview of what to expect with the new EPD calculations. We are not physically able to review every animal in the database, especially with the transition to the new weekly runs. One great advantage to moving to weekly runs is that discovered issues can be resolved more quickly in comparison to the previous schedule of new EPD calculations every six months.

Please contact the ASA office with questions.

ASA Office: 816-599-7777

matt@shorthorn.org


For more information about BOLT, check out the links below.

What to Expect with BOLT

FAQ Multi-breed Genetic Evaluation

Single Step EPDs – Sounding Like a Broken Record

BOLT Trends

BOLT Progeny Equivalents

BOLT Information from IGS

 

 

Contemporary Grouping: Why, When, and How

Proper contemporary groups are just as important to our database and genetic evaluation as proper data collection. Data and contemporary groups build on each other in order to have a strong genetic evaluation. Contemporary groups can be a bit overwhelming, and rightfully so. Knowing which animals belong together in one group or another can take some time to fully grasp. It’s a topic that has been covered many times, but a little refresher course hasn’t ever hurt anyone. Hopefully by sharing some background information and a few helpful hints, your understanding of contemporary grouping will become clearer.

Why We Need Contemporary Groups
As you know, not all weights and measures are created equally because not all cattle are managed in identical environments.

So how do we use data in genetic evaluations when it’s not all collected on an equal playing field? By utilizing proper contemporary groups! Our EPD calculations are driven by comparisons in performance between animals, rather than actual measurements for a trait. Contemporary groups are used to define which animals are to be compared to each other within a herd. By making sure we compare the right animals to each other, we get the best information available to fuel the EPD calculations. Having weights recorded is important, but having the right weights recorded in a contemporary group together is equally necessary.

When to Worry with Contemporary Groups
I commonly get asked when in the production cycle to start paying attention to contemporary groups. The answer is the day your first calf is born, and every time you collect a new piece of data in your herd. Contemporary groups start when birth records are recorded. It is important to ensure that you have your calves grouped correctly at birth, because all subsequent contemporary groups are based off the initial birth groups. The largest contemporary groups will always be for birth records, since cattle can only be removed from the original contemporary group over time. Every time a new data point is collected, the contemporary group should be examined for animals that might have been treated differently and are no longer fairly compared to the rest of the group. Once an animal is no longer on the same playing field (either advantaged or disadvantaged), they need to be regrouped. If you have a calf that gets really sick between birth and weaning, or if you choose some calves to begin prepping for the show barn, those cattle should be removed from the larger contemporary group. When collecting data such as weaning, yearling, or ultrasound, the date of data collection also dictates contemporary groups. All the calves that need to be in the same weaning contemporary group need to have their weaning weights taken on the same day. If there are multiple weighing days, then you will have multiple contemporary groups.

How to Build Your Contemporary Groups
There are some rules you will want to follow when putting your cattle into the proper contemporary groups. The sex of calf is a major factor, always sorting heifers and bulls into their own groups at birth, and then into heifers, steers, and bulls for any data collected from weaning onward. Grouping calves by calving season is also important. Most breeders calve in smaller windows and don’t have to worry too much with season. However, if you don’t have a tight calving season, it is recommended to group your birth contemporaries into 90-day windows to get a fair comparison. Obviously, management and location are a major factor. If you run cows on multiple ranches, then you will have contemporary groups for each ranch. Fortunately, Digital Beef does a pretty good job of covering some of these bases for you. If you need to manually put cattle into different groups, there are functions available to help you do so, such as the “Season” (birth recording) and “Mgmt” (Weaning) options when recording data.As always, we want to help you if you have any questions with your contemporary groups. Not only does having them done correctly benefit you, but also the rest of the breed as we continue to build our database. A stronger database is the foundation for better EPD calculations.

 

2017 ASA/University of Illinois Sire Test Early Results

Early results are in from the 2017 ASA Sire Test with the University of Illinois, and Shorthorn genetics look to be proving their mettle in a real-world commercial setting. Even though they are heavily involved in cow-calf research, the University of Illinois runs their cow herd as close to a no-nonsense commercial operation as you will find in any university system. It’s a great opportunity to work with cattle that are forced to work in tight breeding seasons, have quality udders, and maintain themselves while raising a calf on minimal supplementation. A special thanks to the breeders who participated in the 2017 Sire Test. Without your support, we wouldn’t be able to gather this valuable information that will help move the Shorthorn breed towards our goals of growing commercial acceptance for our cattle. From September 8- October 4, 151 Shorthorn-sired calves were born, with 91% of the calves born in the 17 day window from September 13- September 30. Using UI’s SimAngus cow herd resulted in 123 black-hided calves, 15 black calves with white markings/blue roans, and 13 red hided calves. These calves were raised without creep feed until weaning on February 14, 2018. After some time to precondition the cattle, they will be shipped to the UI Farm near the university campus this month, where they will go on feed. Data collection in this phase of the trial will include gain, feed efficiency, and eventually carcass data. Initial reports indicate that these weights stack up comparably to other calves within the UI herd, showcasing the value of Shorthorns as the British breed crossbreeding solution. Keep in mind that it can be difficult to draw any conclusions comparing groups of extremely small size. Having only 1 or 2 calves may not be a fair representation of a sire’s genetic capabilities. Unfortunately, nature didn’t bless us with perfect distribution of steer and heifer calves across all sires. Weaning weight data listed is adjusted to a 205 day weaning weight. All data has been uploaded to Digital Beef. We are working with UI to plan a field day in August. This will include a chance to see the cattle on feed, as well as educational presentations and fellowship with other Shorthorn breeders. Be sure to look for more information on this event in future issues of the Shorthorn Country. View Full Report Here!

American Rancher featuring Shorthorn Cattle

This is the most recent American Rancher featuring Shorthorn cattle. The ASA slogan ‘Performance with Purpose’ truly describes the Shorthorn breed and the breeders that raise Shorthorn cattle. Check it out!

 

Saturday August 25: National Shorthorn Sire Test Field Day

Mark your calendar for Saturday, August 25. The ASA and the University of Illinois will be hosting the National Shorthorn Sire Text Field Day.
9:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Join us on the U of I campus for an educational program as we discuss the ASA Sire Test. Speakers include Dr. Dan Shike from University of Illinois, Matt Woolfolk from ASA and more.
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. – Lunch catered by the U of I Meat Science Club
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. –  We will head out to the University Farm to view the calves in the feedlot from the 2017 ASA Sire Test
If you would like to join us for this event, please contact Matt Woolfolk to RSVP (matt@shorthorn.org).

2017-2018 Show Region Winners

See the 2017-2018 Show Region Winners below. The detailed report will be in the May/June issue of Shorthorn Country. Be sure to advertise your winner!!

National Shorthorn Show Female of the Year: CF CSF Demi 650 SOL ET, Jake Nikkel, McPherson, KS.

National Shorthorn Show Bull of the Year: SULL RGLC Legacy 525 ET, Rockin’ G Polled Shorthorns, Middletown, IL and Sullivan Farms, Dunlap, IA.

National ShorthornPlus Show Female of the Year: KOLT Blue the Roo 940, Kane Aegerter, Seward, NE.

National ShorthornPlus Show Bull of the Year: 5J Gustus 24E, 5J Farms, LLC, Olney Springs, CO.

 

Northeast Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: CF Dream Lady 6127 AV ET, Elley Inskeep, Lafayette, IN.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: BOY Cucumber 608 ET, Landon Helmke, New Philadelphia, OH.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- TRNR Rose Lass 277 ET, Turner Shorthorns

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- CF Dream Lady 6127 AV ET, Elley Inskeep

Junior Champion Female- CF FR Dream Lady 671 SO, Jacob Shoufler

Senior Champion Female- BOY Cucumber 608 ET, Landon Helmke

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen IV, Saxonburg, PA.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up- BWS Swagger Twin A ET, Bye Well Shorthorns, Portland, IN.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Junior Bull Calf Champion- TRNR Thunder Snow 187 ET, Turner Shorthorns

Junior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- TRNR Wheels Up 47 ET, Turner Shorthorns

Senior Bull Calf Champion- BWS Swagger Twin A ET, Bye Well Shorthorns

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- BWS Swagger Twin B ET, Bye Well Shorthorns

Junior Champion Bull- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen IV

Junior Reserve Champion Bull- BWS Swagger, Bye Well Shorthorns

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- DUNK Mirage 624D ET, Ryan Wickard, Wilkinson, IN.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- BFC Maggie’s Madeline E033, Brandywine Farms Cattle Company, Carthage, IN.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- BFC Maggie’s Madeline E033, Brandywine Farms Cattle Company

Junior Champion Female- DUNK Mirage 624D, Ryan Wickard

Junior Reserve Champion Female- SULL Crystal’s Style 6998 ET, Kyle Piscione

 

ShorthornPlus Bull of the Year- BFC Can’t Touch This 114, Brandywine Farms Cattle Company, Carthage, IN.

ShorthornPlus Bull Runner-Up- FFDL Hot Buckshot, Desirae Logsdon, Amanda, OH.

 

Junior Champion Bull- BFC Can’t Touch This 114, Brandywine Farms Cattle Company

Junior Reserve Champion Bull- FFDL Hot Buckshot, Desirae Logsdon

 

Southeast Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: CF BCL Lucky Charm 5129 E ET, McCall Show Cattle, Shelbyville, KY.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: MDR Mona Jackie 630, Reagan Easton, Bethany, IL.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- Bratcher Mona Lisa 712, Craig Bratcher

Early Spring Heifer Calf Res. Champion- Little Cedar Rose Mary 1718 ET, Charlie & Lanie Sutherland

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- BRH Proud Fool 1720, Caroline Winter

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- MDR Mona Jackie 630, Reagan Easton

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- MFK Hot Sister Sue, Wesley Maurice Korthaus

Intermediate Champion Female- BRH CLF Proud Fool 1620, Cedar Lane Farm

Senior Champion Female- CF BCL Lucky Charm 5129 E ET, McCall Show Cattle

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year- DFM Starstruck, McCall Show Cattle, Shelbyville, KY.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up- MFK Hot Rebel 26K X, Wesley Maurice Korthaus, Smithfield, KY.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- VVCC Dirty Hairy, Valley Vista Farms

Senior Bull Calf Champion- DFM Starstruck, McCall Show Cattle

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- MFK Joe Kidd 346K X, Maurice & Faye Korthaus

Junior Champion Bull- MFK Hot Rebel 26K X, Wesley Maurice Korthaus

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- LCF Roxie Diamond 727, Maria Day, Nicholasville, KY.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- IFS Blue Mattis M1D, Molly Williams, Gamaliel, KY.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- LCF Roxie Diamond 727, Maria Day

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- PRNL Golden Delight 118, Lakin Whatley

Intermediate Champion Female- IFS Blue Mattis M1D, Molly Williams

 

North Central Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: Cowboy’s White Rose, Brodie Abney, South Wayne, WI.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: KOLT-WW Tune Gentry 38 ET, Erica N Harrell, Roseville, IL.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- Bergs April Dream Lady, Kaitlyn Berg

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- DSF Sonya 11E, Brock David Studer

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- DVW Prim Rose 237, Raegan Stone

Intermediate Champion Female- KOLT-WW Tune Gentry 38 ET, Erica Harrell

Intermediate Res. Champion Female (TIE)- Homedale Silver Duchess 643, Lane Thomas Jabs

Bergs Haley Pride, Kaitlyn Berg

Junior Champion Female- Cowboy’s White Rose, Brodie Abney

Junior Res. Champion Female (TIE)- SULL Crystal’s Lilly 6653D ET, Madeline Berg

DUNK Mirage C 608 ET, Wasinger Cattle Company

Senior Champion Female- DVM Primo Dona 136D, Wasinger Cattle Company

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: Berg’s Charmer, Madeline Berg, Osage, IA

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up (TIE): JS Revoltionary, James R Johnson, Niantic, IL

Studer’s Certified 100C, Dale Studer Family, Creston, IA

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- JS Revolutionary, James R Johnson

Early Spring Bull Calf Res. Champion- Studer’s Easy Rider 50E, Dale Studer Family

Junior Bull Calf Champion- Berg’s Hot Shot, Madeline Berg

Senior Bull Calf Champion- Berg’s Charmer, Madeline Berg

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- Studer’s Dazzle, Brock David Studer

Intermediate Champion Bull- Roanoke About Time 916, The Labans

Junior Champion Bull- Studer’s Duke, Dale Studer Family

Senior Champion Bull- Studer’s Certified, Dale Studer Family

 

South Central Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: 3L Miss Holly J 4415, Merideth Behrens, Colbert, OK.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: WHR SRVM Cecilia 6928 ET, Kylie Harlan, Sherman, TX.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Late Spring Heifer Calf Champion- M&E Margie 33 934, M & E Shorthorns

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- WHR PW Augusta Amy 7104 ET, Mary Victoria Zimmer

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- CMF Augusta Pride 1027 ET, Annie Fallon

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- WHR SRVM Cecilia 6928 ET, Kylie Harlan

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- JJ CCF Dolly Parton CM C57D, Crow Creek Farms

Intermediate Champion Female- 3L Miss Holly J 4415, Merideth Behrens

Intermediate Res. Champion Female- JJ Lily TH, TSW Cattle

Junior Champion Female- CYT Max Rosa 6129 ET, Merideth Behrens

Junior Res. Champion Female- HHF Margie 690 SN ET, Caitlyn Rasor

Senior Champion Female- WHR Proud Mary 6204, Cameron Fallon

Senior Res. Champion Female- JJ CCF Rose Girl VT, AJ Show Cattle

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: RSF Lunesta 2D, Ryan Lane, Siloam Springs, AR

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms, Oklahoma City, OK.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Junior Bull Calf Champion- Lazy B Bambino B72, Morgan Brooks

Senior Bull Calf Champion- TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms

Intermediate Champion Bull- RSF Lunesta 2D, Ryan Lane

Intermediate Res. Champion Bull- A Streak of Flash, Abigail Nunn

Junior Champion Bull- CCF JJ Zeus C11D, Crow Creek Farms

Junior Reserve Champion Bull- AJ Joker, AJ Show Cattle

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year: MB Cowgirls Raven, Ashlyn Larman, Orlando, OK.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up: DRCC Miss Emerald Lady, Larahmy Blakley, Oologah, OK.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf- JVCC Red Diamond 701, Kadin Kinder Worthington

Early Spring Heifer Calf Res. Champion- DRCC Miss Emily, Larahmy Blakley

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- DRCC Miss Emerald Lady, Larahmy Blakley

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- MBEH Miss Ulta Chantilly, Merideth Behrens

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- MB Cowgirls Raven, Ashlyn Larman

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- RSF Forever Lady 098D, Alexa Lane

Junior Champion Female- SLF Blue Mona S246, Katie Williams

 

ShorthornPlus Bull of the Year: Cash LF Megatron ET, Darci Cash, Fay, OK.

Senior Champion Bull- Cash LF Megatron ET, Darci Cash

 

West Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year (TIE): LC Augusta Pat 2385, Don Cardey, Turlock, CA

LC Funny Face 2300, Don Cardey, Turlock, CA

CTC Augusta Queen 2057, Chris Cardey, Turlock, CA

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: GSC Sweetheart 1311, Greg Cardey, Turlock, CA

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- LC Augusta Pat 2385, Don Cardey

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- LC Funny Face 2300, Don Cardey

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- GSC Rosie Ransom 2276, Greg Cardy

Intermediate Champion Female- CTC Augusta Queen 2057, Chris Cardey

Junior Champion Female- JT Betty Angel 2056, J T Ranch

Cow/Calf Champion- GSC Sweetheart 1311, Greg Cardey

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: LC Gold Label 1787, Don Cardey, Turlock, CA.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: GSC Gold Label 2148, Greg Cardey, Turlock, CA.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Junior Bull Calf Champion- GSC Studer 2259, Greg Cardey

Junior Bull Calf Res. Champion- LC Gold Label 2250, Don Cardey

Senior Bull Calf Champion- GSC Gold Label 2148, Greg Cardey

Senior Bull Calf Res. Champion- LC Studer 2193, Don Cardey

Intermediate Champion Bull- LC Gold Label 1998, Don Cardey

Intermediate Res. Champion Bull- GSC Studer 2066, Greg Cardey

Junior Champion Bull- GSC Gold Label 1870, Greg Cardey

Senior Champion Bull- LC Gold Label 1787, Don Cardey

Single-Step EPDs: Sounding Like a Broken Record

Have you ever been pulling out of your driveway, headed to church or to dinner, only to notice just before you leave that your cows are out? Well, our cows have gotten out again on our way to finalizing the single-step genetic evaluation using the new BOLT software. When the IGS team noticed an issue with the data submission systems in another breed, it had an effect on all of us that are members of the group. Now they are working on fixing the issues, and would like to do some test runs before releasing the information live to the breeders .Ideally, they would like to have four weekly test runs without errors in able to go live. Doing so will give IGS better opportunities to find and fix issues before releasing the improved run. It’s more important to the IGS team to get it done correctly than to just get it done. Their diligence to bringing us the best genetic evaluation in the industry should certainly be commended, even if we have to be patient a while longer.

With new technology comes a learning curve, and if you are a student like me, repetition is necessary to grasp the major concepts. Since there are some new changes with the transition to the single-step multi-breed genetic evaluation, we will discuss some of those a little further to drive home the significance.

With the move to the new single-step genetic evaluation, it has been noted the accuracy values you will see in the registry will be lower than values from the previous EPD runs. That certainly sounds confusing, but there is a method to the madness. When EPD calculations first began, there simply wasn’t enough computer power available to do the tabulations necessary to come up with the true accuracy of an EPD. Instead, the scientists of the day used a technique called the approximation method to come up with as good of a prediction of accuracy as the technology of the day could compute. Geneticists realized that while these approximations of accuracy were they best they could do at the time, they were probably a bit overinflated compared to the “true” accuracy of an EPD. Thanks to technology advancements, we are now able to process the tabulations that produce the truer accuracy value that wasn’t possible before. It will take some time to wrap our heads around bulls that were once listed at a 0.90 accuracy might now be closer to a 0.65, but remember that the newer, lower number is a better representation of the accuracy value. It’s like your neighbor’s fishing stories: If he told you he caught a 15 pounder (old method of accuracy calculation), in reality he probably caught a 10 or 12 pound fish (new single-step accuracy method)!

A neat feature of the new single-step genetic evaluation is how genomic data is handled during the calculations. We have already covered how the new system eliminates a step in the current process of calculating genomically-enhanced EPDs. What’s interesting is that with the new system, not only does genomic data affect the animal that has been genomically tested, but also related animals. If you have genomically tested your herd bull, then the information gathered from his genotype has an effect on his offspring’s EPDs, as well as half and full siblings and other closely related animals. That does not mean that just having DNA on your herd bulls is a good substitution for genotyping your replacement females or sale bulls. Obviously, having information on an animal’s own genomic profile will be more valuable than just having the sire DNA tested. After all, Dad’s genetics are only half the story! Testing the offspring gives you the full genomic story.

2018 Herdsman – Ron Rutan

The 2018 Shorthorn Herdsman of the Year was awarded to Ron Rutan of RC Show Cattle in Eaton, Ohio. His long history of being involved in the Shorthorn breed began with his parents and grandparents raising Shorthorns. Rutan started RC Show Cattle with Christy Campbell in 1991 and from there he stayed actively involved with Shorthorns.

Rutan has taken cattle all over the country to many national shows over the years and in the last ten years he has displayed quite a few Shorthorn bulls in the yards at the National Western Stock Show.

“We bred the bull Damn Proud and when that bull came along Ron became even more enthusiastic about Shorthorns,” Campbell said.

Rutan has served as a director of the Ohio Shorthorn Association. RC Show Cattle also has an Annual Early Bird Sale on the Saturday of Labor Day weekend to auction their cattle.

Outside of being involved with Shorthorns, Rutan has owned and operated a fence construction business for the last 33 years as well as custom hoof trimming. Many people come from all over Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky to have Rutan trim hooves of their show cattle. Rutan also was Texas for a little bit in the 1970s and had a custom fitting service.

“We always are particular in picking a good string for Louisville,” Campbell said. “RC Show Cattle usually has 13 or 14 head there and people respect that. There are also not many people from Ohio that take cattle to Denver. Ron and Clair Bye took three head and came home with five banners. I would say that is pretty great. People also respect Ron’s quietness and that he isn’t arrogant.”

Rutan said the Shorthorn heritage goes way back in his genes and they were one of the first breeds he worked with growing up. Shorthorns have remained in his life but he enjoys working with all breeds of cattle.

“It was quite the honor to be selected as herdsman,” Rutan said. “It was a total surprise to be chosen. I never would have expected it. It is pretty gratifying to be recognized. I just work hard and do what I love.”

The Shorthorn Herdsman award is in honor of Lawrence Grathwohl, presented by the Grathwohl family and sponsored by the Shorthorn Foundation. Congratulations to Ron Rutan on being selected as the 2018 Shorthorn Herdsman of the Year.

Welcome 2018 Interns!

 

 

 

A desire to advocate for agriculture led Emily Meinhardt to Kansas State University to pursue a degree in Agricultural Communications & Journalism with minors in Animal Sciences & Industry and Leadership Studies. As a sophomore at K-State, Emily enjoys being involved in campus clubs and her sorority because they allow her to meet a diverse group of people. Emily grew up in Marysville, Kansas where she was involved in 4-H and showing Hereford cattle. These experiences sparked her interest in the agricultural industry. With a passion for working with youth and a desire to promote the livestock industry, Emily looks forward to working for the Shorthorn Association as the communications intern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We would like to welcome Emily Dyes of Holliday, Texas to the American Shorthorn Association Team as the registrations intern. Emily grew up in vastly different counties across Texas including Nacogdoches, Bosque, Bandera, and Archer where she raised and exhibited Shorthorn cattle from the 3 rd to 12th grade. Emily is currently attending Texas Tech University and will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Agriculture in May 2019. Emily believes this internship will be a great opportunity to learn more about how a breed association functions from day to day and is looking forward to gaining more knowledge about the beef industry through this experience. Emily is most excited to be working with professionals that share a common passion for the beef cattle industry and how the shorthorn breed will impact the future of the industry.

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Miller is a junior at Oklahoma State University where she is studying agricultural communications and animal science. She grew up in the small town of Linden, California, raising purebred Red Angus cattle with her family. Anna has always had a passion for the agricultural industries, and an interest in international culture has motivated her to study animal science abroad in Dublin, Ireland, for a semester. She is active throughout the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources at OSU. Anna is an officer for the Oklahoma Collegiate Cattlewomen club and the FARM Theory club, as well as a member of the Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow club. After graduation, she hopes to stay involved in the beef industry and work in the communications field. Anna is excited to serve as the Youth Activities intern for the AJSA, and looks forward to learning more about the association and its members!

 

 

National Western Stock Show Results

Yard Show

Champion ShorthornPlus Pen of 3 Heifers; Stepping Stone Ranch, Edson, KS

Champion ShorthornPlus Pen of 5 Bulls: Jungels Shorthorn Farm, Kathryn, ND

Champion ShorthornPlus Pen of 3 Bulls: Jungels Shorthorn Farm, Kathryn, ND

Res. Champion ShorthornPlus Pen of 3 Bulls: Stepping Stone Ranch, Edson, KS

Champion Shorthorn Pen of 3 Heifers: Horton Shorthorns, Saint Charles, IL

Champion Shorthorn Pen of 5 Bulls: Leveldale Farms, Mason City, IL

Res. Champion Shorthorn Pen of 5 Bulls: Jungels Shorthorn Farms, Kathryn, ND

Champion Pen of 3 Shorthorn Bulls: Waukaru Farms, Rensselaer, IN

Res. Champion Pen of 3 Shorthorn Bulls: Greg Crawford Family, Roca, NE

Hill Show

National Western Open Purebred Shorthorn Females
Grand Champion Female: CF CSF Demi 650 SOL ET owned by Jacob Nikkel
Reserve Grand Champion Female: GCC Turners Margie 542 E ET owned by Gavin Cender

National Western Open Purebred Shorthorn Bulls
Grand Champion Bull: SULL RGLC Legacy 525 ET owned by Sullivan Farms and Rocking G Polled Shorthorns
Reserve Grand Champion Bull: CF V8 Marksman X owned by Luke and Catherine Neumayr

National Western Stock Show Open ShorthornPlus Females
Grand Champion Female: KOLT Blue the Roo 940 owned by Kane Aegerter
Reserve Grand Champion Female: SULL Styling Crystals 7022E ET owned by Sara Sullivan

National Western Stock Show Open ShorthornPlus Bulls
Grand Champion: CF NNN Panther X owned by Alison Nicole Nichols
Reserve Grand Champion: R-C Proud Freckles 602 owned by RC Show Cattle

National Western Stock Show Junior ShorthornPlus
Grand Champion Female: KOLT Blue the Roo 940 owned by Kane Aegerter
Reserve Grand Champion Female: SULL Styling Crystals 7022E ET owned by Sara Sullivan

National Western Stock Show Junior Purebred Shorthorn
Grand Champion Female: CF CSF Demi 650 SOL ET owned by Jacob Nikkel
Reserve Grand Champion Female: CF CSF Demi 6100 HC ET owned by Claire Trennepohl