2021 Meet the Interns

Michelle Noggle is from Casey, Ill., where she grew up showing both cattle and pigs. She is a senior at Oklahoma State University (OSU) where she is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science and a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Communications.  Throughout her time at OSU, Michelle has been an active member of Oklahoma Collegiate Cattlewomen’s and the Swine Club. In her spare time, she enjoys reading and painting. Michelle looks forward to serving as the ASA communications intern this summer. Her classes at OSU have prepared her to assist in social media planning, website updates, and design projects. She is excited to learn more about the cattle industry and agricultural communications.

Bella Chaffin is currently a Junior at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, studying agricultural and environmental science communications. In her three years at the university she has been involved in several organizations such as Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow and her sorority, Kappa Delta. She developed a passion for agriculture at a young age on her family’s acreage in Waverly, Nebraska. She grew up raising and showing sheep and was heavily involved in 4-H and FFA. Post-graduation she hopes to use her passion to advocate for agriculture through outreach and education. Bella is excited to start her internship as the registrations intern with the ASA. She looks forward to work with the junior members this summer and learning more about the Shorthorn breed and association. 

Amelia Schatz is a second-year student at Kansas State University, studying Agricultural Communications & Journalism. She is originally from Le Center, Minnesota, where she grew up on a small Limousin operation showing Limousin and Shorthorn cattle. Amelia is currently part of K-State’s Meat Judging team and is very active within our Block & Bridle club. As an active member in the club, she hs developed skills in communications, relationship development and team management that will be a benefit to her in this position. Amelia is very excited to be working within such a great association, surrounded by such talented individuals. She looks forward to serving as the youth activities intern working closely on the contests for the National Junior Shorthorn Show and Youth Conference. 

American Shorthorn Association Announces 2022 Cattlemen’s Congress as Super National Shorthorn Show

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (April 8, 2021) – The American Shorthorn Association Board of Directors met to discuss the Shorthorn breed participation at the 2022 Cattlemen’s Congress and 2022 National Western Livestock Show.

The Board of Directors unanimously approved the 2021-2022 ASA Point Show System recognizing the 2022 Cattlemen’s Congress as a super national and the 2022 National Western Livestock Show as a regional show. The National Shorthorn Summit Sale will be held at Cattlemen’s Congress.

The approved show system will recognize five regions, each having two regional shows, one super regional show and one national show. Regional Awards for the five regions will use the four shows in each region for point calculations. The American Shorthorn Association will recognize one national show within each region and two super national shows for a total of seven shows used for National Award calculations.

“We are excited to announce Cattlemen’s Congress as a super national show for our membership,” said Montie Soules, Executive Secretary/CEO of ASA. “Our new show system expands the available point shows to allow more breeders to exhibit across the country. We look forward to seeing our show participation grow for the 2021-2022 show season.”

The complete ASA Point Show System will be announced to our membership in the May/June issue of Shorthorn Country and will be available at shorthorn.org. The announcement will include participating shows for the 2021-2022 show season and point distribution for each show level.

About ASA

The American Shorthorn Association’s mission is to serve all members and enhance the value of the Shorthorn breed by managing data, maintaining the integrity of the herdbook, educating members and communicating the value of Shorthorn cattle resulting in the expanded use of Shorthorn genetics in the U.S. beef industry. Visit www.shorthorn.org to learn more.

American Shorthorn Association : 7607 NW Prairie View Road, Kansas City, MO 64151: Phone 816.599.7777

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2019 ASA National Sire Test Performance Review

The National Sire Test (NST) program has been a valuable tool for testing the ability of Shorthorn genetics to perform in a real-world setting. The third and final year of the NST and our partnership with the University of Illinois provided us with more data on a genetically diverse bunch of Shorthorn sires. Once again, we were able to collect a full set of data on Shorthorn-influenced cattle from birth to rail. The NST provides breeders the opportunity to test the genetics in their breeding program in a real-world setting while gaining more progeny data on their sires. From a big picture standpoint, the NST gives ASA more information on the breed to show to the industry that our cattle have the capability to be used as a profitable piece of their breeding program.

As was the theme with just about every walk of life in 2020, the National Sire Test experienced some unexpected hiccups and changes to plans. With the Tyson plant in Joslin, IL having capacity cut due to Covid-19 restrictions, the cattle had to stay on feed longer than anticipated before they were able to be harvested. Like previous installments of this program, the ten enrolled sires were bred to 200 U of I cows at their Dixon Spring research farm in December 2018 for these fall-born 2019 calves. After weaning, the calves were moved to the beef farm on campus for the feeding trial and finishing phase. The cattle were on feed for a slightly longer time period than in the past. You will see this longer feeding period reflected in weights on these animals. Below are data compilations of all the sires from the 2019 calf crop. Data is broken down into steers and heifers by sire.

I want to thank all the breeders that participated in this program over the past three years. It has been very rewarding to see Shorthorn-sired cattle perform to industry standards and validate that this breed deserves a chance to play a role in the commercial cattle industry in the United States. Without the help and cooperation of Dr. Dan Shike at the University of Illinois, we wouldn’t have been able to make this project happen. Special thanks to him and his team for all their work, data collection, and being a gracious host and partner over the years of the NST.

New Staff at ASA

March brings spring and a time for new beginnings, including some changes at the American Shorthorn Association!

Emily Velisek, the ASA Director of Events, Show and Membership activities left her job at the ASA at the end of February. Emily joined the ASA staff in July of 2017 and we watched her grow in her position during her time here. We enjoyed working with her and wish her all the best for her future in Iowa! She will be missed but we know we will see her down the road.

Matt Woolfolk, the ASA Director of Performance Programs, Performance Data and Commercial Acceptance recently got engaged and will be leaving us in April. He will still continue to work in his current position. We look forward to our continued work with Matt, even if it isn’t full-time. We are so excited for him and his future with his soon-to-be bride. Congratulations Matt!

Cassie Reid has joined us as Customer Service Specialist and Co-Director of Shows, Event and Membership Services. In this position she will provide customer support and assist with press releases and eblasts. She will also coordinate shows, events and communicate with membership.  

Reid comes to the American Shorthorn Association from the Ozark Empire Fairgrounds & Event Center(OEF) in Springfield, Mo. where she served most recently as the Livestock Director. During her 6-year tenure at OEF, she was active with the International Association of Fairs and Expositions (IAFE), graduating from the Institute of Fair Management in December of 2018. Most recently, Reid served on the IAFE’s Young Professionals Initiative Steering Committee. Reid began her career in 2014 as the Assistant Ag Director at OEF. She is a 2015 alumna of Missouri State University in Springfield, Mo. with a Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Communications. Reid originally hails from Bosworth, Mo. on her family’s diversified row crop and cattle farm. As a 4-H & FFA member, Reid primarily exhibited Shorthorn & Charolais cattle & Boer Goats throughout her youth.

“I look forward to engaging with the members of the American Shorthorn Association and seeing success throughout all aspects of the breed,” Reid said. “My experience in the fair industry provides the confidence needed to see association goals flourish, from start to finish.”

Wade Minihan has joined us as Customer Service Specialist and Co-Director of Shows, Event and Membership Services. In this position he will provide customer support, assist with DNA and weights and measurements management for performance data. He will also coordinate shows, events and communicate with membership.  

 Minihan grew up in Blaine, Kansas on a Commercial Cow/Calf and Registered Hereford cattle operation. While growing up, his family showed cattle at the state and national level. He was an active member of the American Junior Hereford association, as well as, the Kansas Junior Hereford association where he served on the junior board. Minihan graduated from Fort Hays State University, with a bachelor’s degree in agribusiness, with a minor in marketing. While at FHSU, he was involved in many clubs/organizations on campus. Minihan was an intern in 2019 at the American Shorthorn Association.

“I think my internship gave me good knowledge and helped prepare me for this position,” Minihan said. “My internship gave me knowledge of the Shorthorn breed and many connections with people involved in the association. I am excited for this new opportunity and look forward to working with the breeders.”

The ASA is excited to welcome two new members to our team. We may go through a small transition period at ASA during training of our new staff members, but we still will be available to assist our membership! After the two new staff members are trained, you can call in and receive assistance from anyone in the office. All staff will be trained to assist you in the registry.

Virtual Annual Meeting in February

The ASA Annual Meeting will be held virtually on February 6th at 10 a.m. central time zone.

Delegates, you have received an email with information about the annual meeting. You will receive more emails as we have more information! 
ASA members, we will send out an eblast as we get closer to the date of annual meeting with information on how to join the Zoom meeting!

Cattlemen’s Congress Updates

General Information for Shorthorn Breeders: 

  • Shorthorn exhibitors should be able to get into the barn on Thursday, January 7th. The time of move in will depend on how quickly they can clean the trash out from the breed before. 
  • The ASA would like for breeders to be in the barns by Friday, January 8th in the evening. Cattlemen’s Congress has not put this time out, but we are hoping for this. 
  • We have decided to change our check-in time to earlier as you can get in earlier. Check-in will be Saturday, January 9th from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. (noon). There will be no check-in after this time!
  • We do not plan to weigh animals at check-in. We are hopefully, planning to weigh only Open Cattle one their way to the show ring as we are supposed to have scales for that. 
  • Tentative Show Schedule (will continue to be tentative up until the last minute, please note some times have changed from what was posted)
    • Sunday, January 10th at 8 am Shorthorn Pen Show in the Performance Arena. 
    • Sunday, January 10th at 3 pm, Deck the Stalls junior fundraiser
    • Monday, January 11th at 8 am Junior Purebred, Junior ShorthornPlus followed by Open ShorthornPlus Females then Open ShorthornPlus Bulls.
    • Monday January 11th at 5 pm The Summit National Shorthorn Sale 
    • Tuesday, January 12th at 8 am Open Purebred Bulls followed by Open Purebred Females.

Hotels for Shorthorn National Show in Oklahoma City

Headquarters: Best Western Plus Saddleback Inn :: 4300 SW 3rd St. :: Oklahoma City, OK 73108 :: 405.947.7000 :: American Shorthorn Association Exhibitor :: Rate: $74.99 King, $79.99 Double

Hilton Garden Inn Oklahoma City Airport :: 801 S Meridian :: Oklahoma City, OK 73108 :: 405.942.1400 :: American Shorthorn Association :: Rate: $87.00 King or Queens :: Booking Link

American Shorthorn Association Launches Locally Raised Beef Program

Shorthorn breeders unite to promote fresh, quality beef to consumers.

In the early days of the global coronavirus pandemic, many Americans faced an unsettling reality: empty grocery store shelves.

Dramatic changes set in almost overnight and left families spending all of their time at home, limiting trips to the store and buying in bulk to prepare for the unknown. While the pandemic sent shockwaves across all levels of the U.S. economy, it also provided the chance to serve consumers in new and creative ways.

The American Shorthorn Association (ASA) recently launched an initiative to promote members who are offering beef products directly to consumers.

It’s called Shorthorn Beef — Locally Raised.

“During the pandemic some consumers faced food shortages, and this brought to light the importance of having a local source for beef,” says ASA President Nancy Grathwohl-Heter. “A local program is appealing to consumers, because they know where their meat is sourced and how it is raised.”

The Shorthorn Beef program is an avenue for connecting the breed’s cattle producers with those interested in buying locally raised beef. The effort includes promotional opportunities through social media, the ASA website and other media platforms.

“It’s really about families supporting families,” says Montie Soules, ASA executive secretary and CEO. “When you purchase Shorthorn Beef, you’re supporting a family farm and their livelihood. We hope this program continues to open doors between the community and livestock producers.”

When buying directly from a local farmer or rancher, Grathwohl-Heter says consumers can purchase a quarter, half or whole Shorthorn beef and receive great-tasting, healthy products at a reasonable price point. She and her family manage DTR Cattle Company near Raymond, Kansas, and were early participants in Shorthorn Beef — Locally Raised.

“Our family has been raising Shorthorn cattle for four generations, and we strive to produce a tender and delicious product that exceeds consumer expectations,” Grathwohl-Heter says. “We enjoy having a conversation with consumers and sharing our story as a family-owned Shorthorn cattle operation.” 

The gentle, quiet Shorthorn breed — ideal for family-focused farms and ranches — has long been known for its superior-quality beef, ASA says. The breed also has a unique ability to produce high levels of marbling combined with greater levels of muscling than other breeds.

“Shorthorn cattle have always been known for producing tender and highly marbled beef,” Grathwohl-Heter says. “The Shorthorn Beef program highlights the breed’s great end product, and helps breeders create more value and demand for Shorthorn genetics.” 

Participating members will receive marketing support and be featured on the ASA website among the growing directory of Shorthorn breeders with beef to sell. They will also be able to brand their product using the program’s official logo.

“Through this new effort, we hope to provide a niche market for fresh, high-quality local Shorthorn Beef,” Soules says. “Our more than 6,000 adult and junior members from across the country are committed to raising the best possible Shorthorns and supporting the way of life they enjoy. We want to share that message with consumers.”

In addition, Soules sees the effort behind Shorthorn Beef — Locally Raised as an extension of the breed’s American legacy. The Shorthorn was country’s first beef breed and traces its U.S. history to the 1780s.

Next year, the organization celebrates its 150th anniversary — making ASA the nation’s oldest beef cattle association. Go online to access the list of Shorthorn Beef participating breeders or contact ASA for more information on how to get involved in the new program.

IMPORTANT NAILE INFORMATION:

As most of you know by now, the North American International Livestock Exposition is on! It was announced on September 18th that they are planning to move forward and have the show, which makes us all happy after hearing Denver had postponed. With that being said, it is going to look a little different at NAILE this year. Please find the information below for what we know will be happening at NAILE. There is always possibility of change. As we get more information, we will do our best to pass along information to our breeders.   

  • Everyone must enter through Gate 1. It will be the only open gate!
  • Health inspections will be conducted at the time of arrival at the grounds. All animals must have a valid health paper with official USDA 840 EID Tag.
  • All cattle shall be reported Negative on an ELISA or BVD-PI test and can be listed on the health paper.  
  • You will then be directed to the lot right there next to Gate 1 to receive your packet that will include all your passes.
  • Barn Badges will be provided to exhibitors. This will be by the amount you enter so keep that in mind.
    • Exhibitors with 1-5 head will receive 3 passes.
    • Exhibitors with 6-10 head will receive 5 passes.
    • Exhibitors with 11-15 head will receive 7 passes.
    • Exhibitors with 16+ head will receive 8 passes.
  • The Barn Badges will be like lanyards, where you can take them off and give to another person. These will be to get into the barn. If you do not have one on you will not be allowed in the barn, but you can be out at tie-outs or the trailer. The facility is limited on the number of people allowed in the barns at a time and this is how they plan to control that.
  • Participants will not be able to enter the facility without completing the Covid-19 document provided by NAILE.
  • Mask will be required.
  • The Pavilion (where Shorthorns are normally stalled), is partially being used for Covid-19 things. With that being said, there is a possibility we will be stalled somewhere different.
  • Stalling will be the same as last year and we will be following our Stalling Policy. Please see that policy below.
  • Bedding will be pre-bedded. They will disinfect in-between each breed but will not be able to re-bed, so be respectful when loading out and clean up trash. This will allow them to rotate breeds quicker.
  • Shorthorns are lucky enough to be on the same schedule, meaning we will be one of the first breeds in and out of the barns. We will show Junior cattle on Saturday and Sunday, and Open cattle will show on Monday. We will start Monday with ShorthornPlus Bulls followed by ShorthornPlus Females. Then continue with Purebred Bulls followed by Purebred Females.
  • There will be NO Spectators allowed in the show ring. Only people with barn badges will be allowed.
  • There will be restrictions on the number of people allowed in the make-area with each animal. We do not know this number yet.
  • They are considering opening up the Sale Arena for a certain number of spectators during sales only, but this has not yet been confirmed. This does not mean that those people will be allowed in the barn.

Disclaimer, this is what we know as of now but there is possibility this could change. We wanted to get this information out to our Shorthorn Breeders to try and stop rumors and help you make decisions before entries close. Entries close on October 1st with late entries being October 10th.

Stalling Policy; we will be following the NAILE stalling policy.

            NAILE uses our entries from the previous year to plan how much stalling we receive for our breed. They will take a percentage away from our previous year entries and then take a percentage away for no shows of current entries. So, what does this mean for you?

We get less stalls assigned for Shorthorns than what are entered. We advise that you enter more head then what you plan to bring because we will cut down on your stall space from what you enter by the same percentage that we are cut by NAILE. Please add space for tack to your entries. (NAILE does not allow any tack space when assigning breed stalling space)

If you have any stalling request, we will take them, but we cannot promise that you will get them as we will be stalling where you fit best. Stalling request need to be in by November 1st to Emily at emilyv@shorthorn.org, in order for them to be taken into consideration. Also, please contact Emily if you are coming or not coming to the show. Stall space will be made solely off of number of head entered.

2021 IGS Steer Profitability Competition

The Steer Profitability Competition (SPC) is designed to provide junior members meaningful exposure to the opportunities and challenges associated with cattle feeding. The SPC will not only allow participants to measure and compare the profitability of their own animal(s), but of greater importance, it will introduce young beef enthusiasts to peers, mentors, industry advocates, and experiences that are exceedingly difficult to acquire for any beef producer. Participants in the SPC program will be powerful voices as they transition from junior membership to adult participation within the beef industry.