Road to Junior Nationals

Hey everybody! We are getting everything packed and ready for Junior Nationals! We are heading out to Abilene on Thursday with Shelby and we are pumped! Our travel itinerary for the day is to get to the office around 6am to pack up the car and then head out around 7:30, next (and possibly most important), we will stop in Oklahoma City at the Whataburger for lunch (as directed by Shelby). We hope to be in Abilene around 4:30 that evening to start getting everything set up.

           In this blog post, we are sharing one of our favorite things with you guys: our music! In the office, we are always jamming so we decided to create a “Road to JR Nationals” playlist. We have each included 5 of our favorite songs that we contributed to the playlist. Happy listening & see you in Abilene!

Cassidy’s essentials:

  1. Tall City Blues – Flatland Cavalry
  2. Good Lord Lorrie – Turnpike Troubadours
  3. Elisabeth – Zach Bryan
  4. Rodeo Clown – Randy Rogers and Wade Bowen
  5. Burn it at Both Ends – Randall King

Kendall’s essentials:

  1. Me and My Kind – Cody Johnson
  2. My Texas – Josh Abbott Band and Pat Green
  3. Follow You to Virgie – Tyler Childers
  4. Million Miles – Kody West
  5. 14 Miles From Home – Six Market Blvd.

Abigail’s essentials:

  1. Traveler’s Song – Flatland Cavalry
  2. Panhandle Slim – The Panhandlers
  3. Easton & Main – Turnpike Troubadours
  4. Rhinestoned – Randy Rogers and Wade Bowen
  5. Die Rockin – Whiskey Myers

Shelby’s essentials:

  1. Mississippi Girl – Faith Hill
  2. ALL Shania Twain
  3. Run – George Strait
  4. Cows Around – Corb Lund
  5. Lord Bury Me in Texas – Shane Smith & the Saints

Junior Nationals Prep with the Interns

Hey y’all! We have 11 days until Junior Nationals and we hope you are excited as we are! For today’s blog post, we wanted to update everyone on what we have been working on, what we are excited for and give some advice to all of our juniors in preparation for NJSS! We are so pumped for a great week in Abilene and we can’t wait to see everyone!

Cassidy:

What are you working on in preparation for Junior Nationals?

  • As we prepare to head down to Abilene, I am busy getting things together for ALL the contests. I’m doing a lot of printing to get scoresheets and result sheets ready. My favorite thing to do is sort through the prizes as they come in and, believe me, these prizes are NICE!

What are you looking forward to the most at Junior Nationals?

  • I am really looking forward to seeing all of the exhibitors as they compete throughout the week. I loved competing in different contests when I was a junior and am excited to be on this side of the event. I am also super excited to see Flatland Cavalry as they are definitely one of my favorite bands.

What are the essential items on your packing list?

  • Adidas tennis shoes, my flat iron, a quality playlist and of course, a good attitude.

What advice do you have for junior members?

  • Get out there and get to know other exhibitors and don’t be too competitive!

Kendall:

What are you working on in preparation for Junior Nationals?

  • I have been rounding up all the entries over the past couple weeks and double checking everything is correct. Lately I have been spending a large amount of my time to send confirmation emails to every member to make sure their entries are correct. In the weeks leading up to nationals I will be making labels for all the animal’s and kid’s numbers. This will take up most of my time leading up to when we leave for Texas.

What are you looking forward to the most at Junior Nationals?

  • I am looking forward to a fun filled week in Texas. I am also excited to finally be a part of the behind the scenes of a national show. Also, to help possibly make this the greatest week of your summer. It will also be great to finally put faces to names after working with entries for the past month.

What are the essential items on your packing list?

  • My croc sneakers, my Navajo pearls, and Chapstick.

What advice do you have for junior members?

  • Have fun, get out there and meet people from different states!

Abigail:

What are you working on in preparation for Junior Nationals?

  • I finished up putting the exhibitor folder together, so now my primary job is putting together social media posts about contest rules and reminders as well as creating daily schedules to keep everyone up to date while we are actually in Abilene. I have also been updating press releases so that they can be sent out with scholarship, contest and show winners after Junior Nationals. It’s been really busy, but it’s a lot of fun!

What are you looking forward to most at Junior Nationals?

  • I am really looking forward to being behind the camera. Before heading to Kansas City for my internship I did a couple of senior picture shoots for friends, but it has been a little while since I have gotten to photograph livestock and I can’t wait! I am also really excited about seeing Flatland Cavalry and looking forward to a honey butter chicken biscuit from Whataburger.

What are the essential items on your packing list?

  • My camera, earbuds for the drive, and my pillow.

What advice do you have for junior members?

  • Don’t be too serious. I know it’s easy to get caught up in wanting to win, but don’t forget to have fun too!

ASA Members, welcome the newly formed band, “The Red Roans”

Our names are Wade, Wyatt, and Faith and we will be your entertainment (interns) for this summer’s tour. The biggest show of the year is scheduled in Lebanon, Tennessee, on June 17. We have been very busy preparing for the performance of the year and we’re ready for a week of “Strumming a Shorthorn Tune!” Our band members and stage crew here at ASA are excited for a fun filled week and can’t wait for the final performance!

 

Keyboard Player Wyatt

Is everyone ready for a good time?!? This past week in the office has been very busy but also very enjoyable! My main focus has been preparing the set list (exhibitor folders), designing graphics and preparing content for our social media pages. I have really enjoyed meeting my fellow band members (other interns, well only one of the interns since the one of them is my twin brother) and the stage crew (ASA staff) as we prepare for this great performance! I have really enjoyed Kansas City and look forward to exploring more! I’m very excited to meet you all in Tennessee!

Guitarist Faith

How’s everyone doing?! I have been Strumming a Shorthorn Tune all week as my band members (other interns) and I prepare for our upcoming concert! I have been working hard on ticket orders (entries) to make sure that you have all the correct information and payments to attend this great performance that you don’t want to miss. I’m excited to be here and can’t wait to learn more about Kansas City and the Shorthorn breed. Hope you’re ready to rock out and strum along with my crew and me! If you have any questions about your tickets (entries) make sure to contact me or our lead singer (Shelby Rogers) at any time!

Drummer Wade

Who’s ready to have some fun?! Hope you’re all ready to pack the seats and tap along to the best hits at the greatest concert of the summer. I have been incredibly busy preparing contests for our audience (Junior members) and making sure the week is filled with exciting and competitive activities. The fellow band members and set crew have enjoyed the last week of getting to know each other and we are looking forward for the final performance in Tennessee. Kansas City has been a good time and I’m excited for more adventures in the near future. Make sure to get your tickets booked and get ready to jam along to the newest and hottest hit of the summer!

 

We are 18 days away from the biggest concert of the summer and can’t wait to enjoy the fun filled week in Tennessee!

 

Welcome 2019 Interns!!

Faith Massingill is a senior at West Texas A&M University majoring in Agriculture Media and Communication. She grew up in a small town called, Hamilton, Texas, where she raised both Purebred Angus and Red Angus cattle with her family. She was very active in 4-H and FFA, competing in every contest possible which all led to her finding her passion. At school, Faith is heavily involved with the Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow serving as an officer as well as an Ag Ambassador for the Department of Agriculture. She hopes to find herself working for the cattle industry one day as she continues to pursue her passion for advocating the agriculture industry. Faith can’t wait to meet everyone and get to work with the American Shorthorn Association!

 

Wade Minihan grew up on a commercial cow operation, as well as a Registered Hereford operation in Wheaton, KS. The operation is managed by his parents, alongwith his older brother, twin brother, and younger sister. Wade is currently attending Fort Hays State University in Hays, KS pursuing a bachelor’s degree in agribusiness, with a minor in marketing. Involvement on the collegiate level consists of Vice-President of Block and Bridle on the campus of Fort Hays State University. In addition, he serves as a senator with the Student Government Association and he is a junior board member of the Kansas Junior Hereford Association. Wade has been showing cattle for the past 14 years at the county, state, and national level. Wade has a passion instilled in the cattle industry and for the next generation of the livestock industry. He strives to be a role model for the younger generation, as they are the boots on the ground representation that is to come. Wade believes there is no better achievement than having the ability to assist and motivate the youth of this industry that we are all passionate about. He is excited to be the youth activities intern for ASA this summer!

 

 

Wyatt Minihan is currently a junior at Kansas State University majoring in Agriculture Communications and Journalism. Wyatt grew up in the small town of Wheaton, KS where his family owned and operated a commercial, cow-calf operation while also raising and showing registered, Hereford cattle. Growing up in the rural community sparked his ambition to become an advocate for the agricultural industry. While attending K-State, Wyatt has been involved in many clubs and campus activities including the Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow and Block and Bridle. Wyatt plans to use his interest in photography, graphic design, and passion for agriculture in his future to better serve the agricultural industry. Wyatt is looking forward to serving as your communications intern for the AJSA and learning more about the beef industry and this association.

ASA BOARD MODIFIES MISSION STATEMENT, VISIONS AND CORE VALUES

At the end of February, the American Shorthorn Association board of directors met in Kansas City for a strategic planning session led by Kevin Oschner. During the session, the board revised the ASA mission statement, vision, core values and core strategies.

The new mission statement is “the mission of the American Shorthorn Association is to serve all members and enhance the value of the Shorthorn breed by managing data, maintaining the integrity of the herdbook, educating members and communicating the value of Shorthorn cattle resulting in the expanded use of Shorthorn genetics in the U.S. beef industry.”

The new ASA vision is to be recognized in the industry as a viable British breed that creates profitability in beef cattle production, with a family-friendly environment.

The new ASA core values are diversity: we value diversity of members and breeding programs, transparency: we value the importance of a transparent database and herdbook, family: we value programs and activities that encourage and support family-based beef production, accountability: we believe its important for individuals to take ownership of their actions and decisions, honesty and integrity: we believe that strong relationships are based on personal honesty and integrity, technology: we value the role technology plays in advancing beef production and the Shorthorn breed, heritage/history: we celebrate the rich history of the Shorthorn breed, and customer service: we commit ourselves to treating our members like valued customers.

The new ASA core strategies are to increase commercial interest in Shorthorn genetics, educate, equip & empower our members, continue to develop & support the junior program, and invest in research & development to enable breed improvement.

“This strategic planning session was truly valuable in updating our association to fit how we have grown and will continue to grow as a breed including prioritizing the importance of the Shorthorn breed in the commercial cattle industry,” said Montie D. Soules, executive secretary/CEO of ASA. “The board spent two days planning to make sure we were including all current and future members of the ASA so that we can serve them to the best of our ability.”

Adios Interns

Today marks the last day of our internship here in Kansas City. It’s been a whirlwind of a time learning about the association, working with junior members and planning Junior Nationals and the IGS Summit. These summer months have flown by and we are going to miss all of the staff members in the office, but we are leaving with some great memories and experiences. Working in a breed association has been the perfect opportunity to help us grow in our professional skills and give us a look into career possibilities. Everyone in the office has been so welcoming and helpful, and we are grateful for the friendly atmosphere we were able to work in.

 

For our last day, we decided to throw a potluck brunch. This year, for the Beef Cook-Off contest at Junior Nationals, the key ingredient was steak. We decided to center our dish around this cut of beef and thought breakfast burritos would be the perfect way to start our last day. After searing the steak on the stove, we added some scrambled eggs and bundled the mix up in individual flour tortillas. Shelby brought potatoes as her side dish, which made for a great addition to the burritos. After a healthy dose of some salsa and cheese, the perfect burrito was born and the fiesta began!

 

Once everyone had eaten their body weight in burritos and side dishes, it was time for Anna and Emily Dyes to return to college for their final year of school, and Emily Meinhardt for her junior year. Our time here may have seemed short, but we will remember our experiences for a long time to come.

Weekend in Cow Town

Emily Meinhardt

My first trip to the historic “Cow Town” was definitely a memorable one. Summit offered so many great opportunities to grow your industry knowledge, experience the Stockyards and see breeders’ operations. For me, getting to know people and making connections always ends up being my favorite part. I loved getting to meet kids my age across the different breeds, along with learning about their breeds by attending the ranch tours. I am not much of a history geek, but I found the Stockyard history very interesting to learn with the impact Fort Worth had on the cattle industry. This is a great opportunity that I believe every junior should take advantage of.

 

Anna Miller

I was excited to attend Summit this year because it was held in the historic Stockyards of Fort Worth, Texas. The Stockyards has such a fun atmosphere, and there is so much western expansion history in the area that it makes for an interesting visit. My favorite part of Summit was being able to interact with the juniors on a more personal level compared to junior nationals. In Madison, I mostly dealt with the junior members on paper and didn’t have many opportunities to get to know them. However, at Summit I was in charge of icebreakers and group activities. This gave me more of a chance to interact with members from across the three different associations. My family raises Red Angus cattle, so it was interesting for me to tour ranches from three different breeds that I am not as familiar with. Overall, Summit was a blast and felt more like a vacation than a weekend of work!

 

Emily Dyes

For me, one of the highlights of our trip to Fort Worth was the quick tour we had of the Stockyards. I grew up in Texas and have been to the Stockyards numerous times, but I still found it interesting to learn about the role that Fort Worth played in shaping the cattle industry and learned a lot of facts I didn’t previously know. A fact I learned was that cattle were only worth four dollars in San Antonio area and worth $40 in Kansas City — it definitely makes sense why everyone was moving cattle up the Chisholm Trail! Also, Bonnie and Clyde stayed at the Stockyards Hotel, so it was pretty cool to be in a building they once were in.

Interns Views on NJSS

Now that we are all settled back in from the NJSS we want to share with you what us interns enjoyed about the week in Madison.

 

Emily Meinhardt

Growing up attending Hereford Junior Nationals, being part of NJSS was a different experience for me. I have enjoyed seeing all the little and big details that go into planning a national event. Attending Junior Nationals has always been the highlight of my summer, so I enjoyed attending another one and getting to know exhibitors and breeders within the Shorthorn breed. I spent a large majority of my time capturing those precious moments through a lens at NJSS. Getting to photograph each exhibitor showcasing their projects and watching their passion shine was definitely the highlight of my experience. Here are a few of my favorite pictures from the week “Under the Big Top.”

 

Emily Dyes

My favorite part of Junior Nationals was getting to see all of the time and hard work put into each participant’s projects. Whether it was in the show ring or contests, kids from across the country took pride in what they brought to Madison. Being the Registrations intern, I felt like I knew every kid’s name by heart and talked to many parents on the phone, so finally putting faces to all the names was awesome. Thanks for a great NJSS this year, good luck to everyone next year!

Anna Miller

The National Junior Shorthorn Show was one of the first times I have experienced a Junior Nationals. It was a huge learning experience for me, and I really enjoyed the behind-the-scenes aspect of helping to organize the event. As the Youth Activities intern, I enjoyed organizing contests and meeting contest judges, putting together scripts and presentations, and helping with the odd tasks that needed to be done. It was exciting to arrive at the NJSS and finally be able to put a face to all the names I learned in preparation for Junior Nationals. Overall, the show was an incredible opportunity and I have so many fun memories!

 

Essentials for a Successful Week

Only 6 more days until we are all “Under the Big Top” in Madison, Wisconsin! Here in the office we are packing things up and figured we would remind you all about the essentials you need to survive the week.

As you pack your trailer to head to Junior Nationals here is a tune (and show packing list) for you to listen to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qS8nU9qxVTk.

ESSENTIALS:

                                                      WATER

HYDRATE. HYDRATE. HYDRATE. Make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day. Days in the barn can get long and will be even longer if you’re not properly hydrated.

 

SNACKS

Busy days at Junior Nationals can cause kids to get “Hangry.” Be sure to pack all your favorite snacks. Here is a list of our favorite snacks at cattle shows:

Emily M.: Grapes, Chex Mix, Pringles

Anna: Pita Chips, Hummus, Salami

Emily D.: Cheese sticks, Cheez-Its, Cinnamon Rolls

 

COMFORTABLE SHOES

Standing on cement all day can be hard on the feet. Be sure to pack a variety of shoes to switch out from day to day. You will appreciate this decision later in the week.

 

HAIR

Your cattle’s hair typically always comes first, so remember Revive and brushes to make sure their hair is on point for the show ring. Next, your hair. Rain is in the forecast!! Hats are a lifesaver on rainy days, or even days you just want to sleep in an extra 10 minutes.

 

REGISTRATION PAPERS

Don’t get to check-in and end up getting the “YOU HAD ONE JOB” look. Make sure those registration papers and health papers are in a safe spot to bring to check-in.

 

PROJECTS

Don’t forget to pack those projects you have spent countless hours on! Make sure to bring extra supplies, just in case something gets messed up on the drive!

 

POSITIVE ATTITUDE

The most important thing to pack along: a positive attitude. Cattle shows call for early mornings and late evenings, but a positive attitude always makes it more enjoyable. This week is about making memories that you’ll cherish for a life time, while making new friends along the way.

 

Hope we could help with your preparation for Junior Nationals! Safe travels as you make your way to Madison!