Top 15 Show Essentials that often get forgotten- Don’t forget these!

As we pack and get ready to leave for the National Junior Shorthorn Show, we thought it would be a good idea to put together a list of items that often get forgotten. Below is the Top 15 items that we have forgotten and we don’t want you to make the same mistake!

  1. Show Stick
  • This may seem like a “no duh,” but we can’t name the amount of times that we had to borrow a show stick.
  1. Extra Socks and Shoes
  • You don’t want wet shoes all day after washing!
  1. Registration Papers & Health Papers
  1. Speakers/Headphones
  • Who doesn’t love some good tunes at a show?! But remember your surrounding and your audience, you’re a role model for your fellow members.
  1. Favorite Food/Snacks
  • Although fair and concession food is delicious, it can get tiring after a few days. Make sure to bring some of your favorite snacks! Below is a couple of our favorite food while attending shows!

Wyatt: crockpot cheesy potatoes, cake cookies, and hobo sandwiches

Faith: Chips, summer sausage & cheese, and sweet tea

Wade: crockpot breakfast burritos, peanut butter cornflake bars, and cinnamon rolls

  1. Lawn Chairs, Coolers, & Crockpots
  • Lawn chair for naps, cooler for drinks and food, and crockpots for cooking.
  1. Contest materials
  1. Boots
  • You don’t want to show in your barn shoes.
  1. Favorite Starched Show Jeans
  • You also don’t want to show in your barn jeans.
  1. Revive, Hocus Pocus, Tall Adhesive, & Paint
  • Although you can buy these at many shows, it’s easy to spend some big bucks if you forget these.
  1. Clippers
  • These are crucial in preparation for the showring.
  1. Extensions Cords
  • Clipper and blower cords are only so long….
  1. Wash Bucket, water hose, and foamer
  • You ever tried washing an animal without these? Good luck.
  1. Fans
  • Remember, “No Butt Fans in the Barn.” But they are allowed in tie outs
  1. Show Halters
  • It happens to everyone, double check before you leave!

We are 3 DAYS from Junior Nationals! We can’t wait to see you all in Tennessee!

Getting to Know the Interns- 20 Crazy Questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. What are you most looking forward to at Shorthorn Junior National?

Wyatt

I am most looking forward to taking pictures and getting to meet the youth of the Shorthorn breed.

Faith

I am most looking forward to visiting Tennessee again! I can’t wait to get to meet the junior members and to see some awesome cattle!

Wade

I’m most looking forward to watching junior nationals unfold from behind the scenes and all the hard work we are putting in at the office be used and put to good use.

 

  1. Dream vacation location?

Wyatt

Ireland

Faith

Athens, Greece, to hike around the ruins and see the houses there.

Wade

Some tropical private island, with clear water

 

  1. Biggest Pet peeve?

Wyatt

People who chew food with their mouths open.

Faith

Lying or not cleaning up after yourself.

Wade

Feet dragging, being left on read or not returning a call

 

  1. Top 5 Favorite Foods?

Wyatt

  1. Cottage cheese
  2. Little Debby Zebra Cakes
  3. Fried bologna sandwiches
  4. Texas roadhouse rolls
  5. Mac and cheese

Faith

  1. Tacos, tacos, tacos!
  2. Spaghetti and Meatballs
  3. Mac and Cheese
  4. Chips and Salsa (because this is definitely a meal)
  5. Summer Sausage and Cheese

Wade

  1. Mac n cheese
  2. Steak
  3. Popeyes chicken strips
  4. Jalapeno chips
  5. Vanilla wedding cake

 

  1. What would you rank 10/10?

Wyatt

Dillon’s Chinese Food

Faith

The twin’s music taste a 10/10 recommend

(unsweet tea a 10/10 NOT recommend)

Wade

Hereford Junior Nationals and I bet Shorthorn Junior Nationals will be this year!

 

  1. If money was no object, what would you do all day?

Wyatt

Something creative. I really enjoy photography, graphic design, and making stuff.

Faith

I would probably spend all day behind the camera and in the pasture with cattle and horses. Minus, the time I would be vacationing in Europe and Asia.

Wade

Raise and show cattle

 

  1. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

Wyatt

A career in the agricultural industry that incorporates my hobbies and passion.

Faith

Working as a photographer and hopefully working as a videographer as well.

Wade

Settled down, and maybe have a herd of Hereford cattle.

 

  1. How many pillows do you sleep with?

Wyatt

4

Faith

Usually 10…. Yes, I do use them all.

Wade

7

 

  1. Top 3 Cattle breeds?

Wyatt

  1. Hereford
  2. Shorthorn
  3. Longhorn (I think they’re pretty cool)

Faith

  1. Angus (duh)
  2. Shorthorn
  3. Red Angus

Wade

  1. Hereford
  2. Angus
  3. Mini Herefords

 

  1. Favorite Drink?

Wyatt

Dr. Pepper with blackberry and vanilla from Sonic. It tastes like the color purple! Weird but you need to try it!

Faith

Sweet Tea or Dr. Pepper (these are both drinks that Texans survive on)

Wade

Sonic Cherry Limeades

 

  1. What are you addicted too?

Wyatt

Sweets. I love vanilla wedding cake and can’t tell myself no.

Faith

Anything spicy (aka good Mexican food) and all things sweet tea.

Wade

Spending money.

 

  1. Is a hot dog a sandwich, and why?

Wyatt

I’m going to say yes because it’s between bread.

Faith

NO! A hot dog is a hot dog that is my reasoning.

Wade

A hot dog is its own “breed” of food.

 

  1. Least favorite food?

Wyatt

Celery or Brussel sprouts

Faith

Anything with veggies or fruit. Not a fan.

Wade

Brussels sprouts

 

  1. Favorite social media platform?

Wyatt

Instagram all the way. @wywyfromwheaton

Faith

I have tried to cut back on social media use so probably Facebook as of right now.

Wade

Instagram.

 

  1. Favorite Major Show?

Wyatt

National Western Stock Show

Faith

Fort Worth hands down.

Wade

National Western Stock Show or Hereford Junior Nationals

 

  1. If peanut butter wasn’t called peanut butter, what would it be called?

Wyatt

Goober Goo

Faith

Peanutter! (this is my dog’s nick name so that’s why)

Wade

Creamy Peanuts

 

  1. What’s your university and what is an interesting fact?

Wyatt

Kansas State University. (Go cats!) Purple Pride blueberry ice cream is the official flavor for K-State and only the dairy manager at Call Hall knows the official recipe.

Faith

I recently graduated from West Texas A&M University! (Go Buffs)!!!!

An interesting fact about my college is that we are one of the few schools to still have a live mascot. Not to mention that our school administration building use to double as a basketball court and a swimming pool!

Wade

Fort Hays State University. FHSU was originally located on the grounds of Fort Hays, a frontier military outpost that was closed in 1889.

 

  1. What word can you never remember how to spell?

Wyatt

Karake, Karokee, Karoakee, KARAOKE

Faith

Tenesse, Tennesee, Tennessee- Ironic I know

Wade

Definately, Definitely

 

  1. Are you usually early or late?

Wyatt

Late. I don’t know what early means.

Faith

Late… If I tell you I’m leaving somewhere I am most likely sitting on my couch still on my phone fifteen minutes later.

Wade

Late.

 

  1. Favorite task about your internship so far?

Wyatt

My favorite task has been designing the exhibitor folder. It’s a lot of work but it’s so satisfying to see the final product.

Faith

My favorite task is probably getting to pack for nationals. I love getting ready for shows no matter where I am at or where I am going.

Wade

Organizing and packing all the awards. There are so many cool awards and the junior members are in for a real treat.

 

We hope you all enjoyed these fun facts and you learned a few new things about us! We’re super excited to meet you all at Junior Nationals while we are all Strumming a Shorthorn Tune! We are 11 days from NJSS!

 

ASA Members, welcome the newly formed band, “The Red Roans”

Our names are Wade, Wyatt, and Faith and we will be your entertainment (interns) for this summer’s tour. The biggest show of the year is scheduled in Lebanon, Tennessee, on June 17. We have been very busy preparing for the performance of the year and we’re ready for a week of “Strumming a Shorthorn Tune!” Our band members and stage crew here at ASA are excited for a fun filled week and can’t wait for the final performance!

 

Keyboard Player Wyatt

Is everyone ready for a good time?!? This past week in the office has been very busy but also very enjoyable! My main focus has been preparing the set list (exhibitor folders), designing graphics and preparing content for our social media pages. I have really enjoyed meeting my fellow band members (other interns, well only one of the interns since the one of them is my twin brother) and the stage crew (ASA staff) as we prepare for this great performance! I have really enjoyed Kansas City and look forward to exploring more! I’m very excited to meet you all in Tennessee!

Guitarist Faith

How’s everyone doing?! I have been Strumming a Shorthorn Tune all week as my band members (other interns) and I prepare for our upcoming concert! I have been working hard on ticket orders (entries) to make sure that you have all the correct information and payments to attend this great performance that you don’t want to miss. I’m excited to be here and can’t wait to learn more about Kansas City and the Shorthorn breed. Hope you’re ready to rock out and strum along with my crew and me! If you have any questions about your tickets (entries) make sure to contact me or our lead singer (Shelby Rogers) at any time!

Drummer Wade

Who’s ready to have some fun?! Hope you’re all ready to pack the seats and tap along to the best hits at the greatest concert of the summer. I have been incredibly busy preparing contests for our audience (Junior members) and making sure the week is filled with exciting and competitive activities. The fellow band members and set crew have enjoyed the last week of getting to know each other and we are looking forward for the final performance in Tennessee. Kansas City has been a good time and I’m excited for more adventures in the near future. Make sure to get your tickets booked and get ready to jam along to the newest and hottest hit of the summer!

 

We are 18 days away from the biggest concert of the summer and can’t wait to enjoy the fun filled week in Tennessee!

 

Further Thoughts on the 2017 National Sire Test

In the February issue, there was a Performance Review from the 2017 ASA National Sire Test (NST) at the University of Illinois highlighting what we gathered from the data on the first set of Shorthorn-sired calves to go through the NST program. The first round of the NST created some positive energy among breeders who are interested in performance testing and using data in their breeding programs. With this project, a lot of data was collected that is either new to the industry or hasn’t been as prevalent in the Shorthorn database. There have been some questions as to what data is the most important or should be emphasized by Shorthorn breeders. I don’t think there is a single correct answer to that, but I certainly have an opinion on what I think is important to consider as a breeder, as well as the Shorthorn breed as a whole. Read more of Matt’s article here.

Welcome 2019 Interns!!

Faith Massingill is a senior at West Texas A&M University majoring in Agriculture Media and Communication. She grew up in a small town called, Hamilton, Texas, where she raised both Purebred Angus and Red Angus cattle with her family. She was very active in 4-H and FFA, competing in every contest possible which all led to her finding her passion. At school, Faith is heavily involved with the Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow serving as an officer as well as an Ag Ambassador for the Department of Agriculture. She hopes to find herself working for the cattle industry one day as she continues to pursue her passion for advocating the agriculture industry. Faith can’t wait to meet everyone and get to work with the American Shorthorn Association!

 

Wade Minihan grew up on a commercial cow operation, as well as a Registered Hereford operation in Wheaton, KS. The operation is managed by his parents, alongwith his older brother, twin brother, and younger sister. Wade is currently attending Fort Hays State University in Hays, KS pursuing a bachelor’s degree in agribusiness, with a minor in marketing. Involvement on the collegiate level consists of Vice-President of Block and Bridle on the campus of Fort Hays State University. In addition, he serves as a senator with the Student Government Association and he is a junior board member of the Kansas Junior Hereford Association. Wade has been showing cattle for the past 14 years at the county, state, and national level. Wade has a passion instilled in the cattle industry and for the next generation of the livestock industry. He strives to be a role model for the younger generation, as they are the boots on the ground representation that is to come. Wade believes there is no better achievement than having the ability to assist and motivate the youth of this industry that we are all passionate about. He is excited to be the youth activities intern for ASA this summer!

 

 

Wyatt Minihan is currently a junior at Kansas State University majoring in Agriculture Communications and Journalism. Wyatt grew up in the small town of Wheaton, KS where his family owned and operated a commercial, cow-calf operation while also raising and showing registered, Hereford cattle. Growing up in the rural community sparked his ambition to become an advocate for the agricultural industry. While attending K-State, Wyatt has been involved in many clubs and campus activities including the Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow and Block and Bridle. Wyatt plans to use his interest in photography, graphic design, and passion for agriculture in his future to better serve the agricultural industry. Wyatt is looking forward to serving as your communications intern for the AJSA and learning more about the beef industry and this association.

2018-2019 National & Regional Show Winners

See the 2018-2019 Show Region Winners below. The detailed report will be in the May/June issue of Shorthorn Country.

 

National Shorthorn Show Female of the Year: Steck Chelsie C 704 ET, Riley Johnson, Jackson, MN.

National Shorthorn Show Bull of the Year: TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

National ShorthornPlus Show Female of the Year: SULL Black Cherri 7217E ET, Jake Brandt, Clarion, IA.

National ShorthornPlus Show Bull of the Year: CCF Nicholas C59E, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

 

Northeast Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: CF V8 Mona Lisa Reward 782 SOL ET, Ryan Wickard, Wilkinson, IN.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: Midnight Madison 716, Annette Braun, Mechanicsville, MD.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- HAA Fantasies Halo ET, Todd DeGasperi

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- SULL Myrtle 7655E ET, April Troyer

Senior Heifer Calf Reserve Champion- M&L Misty’s Deception 1217, Landon Helmke

Intermediate Champion Female- Midnight Madison 716. Annette Braun

Intermediate Reserve Champion Female- Don Amber 520 ET, April Troyer

Junior Champion Female- CF V8 Mona Lisa Reward SOL ET, Ryan Wickard

Junior Reserve Champion Female- Armstron Queen 1704 ET, Benjamin Allen

Senior Champion Female- SULL Rose’s Legacy 7102E ET, Kolten DeGasperi

Senior Reserve Champion Female- SS Ocean Mirage 714 ET, Marsch Show Cattle

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV, Saxonburg, PA.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up- GLF Spirit Fusion, Henry Dodrer, Jr., Westminster, MD.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Senior Bull Calf Champion- GLF Spirit Fusion, Henry Dodrer, Jr.

Junior Champion Bull- MVF Hot Rod, Masonic Village Farm

Senior Champion Bull- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- HAA Ebony, Kolten DeGasperi, Westminster, MD.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- Burgess Red Ivy 27017 ET, Annette Braun, Mechanicsville, MD.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Junior Champion Female- HAA Ebony, Kolten DeGasperi

Junior Reserve Champion Female- Burgess Red Ivy 27017 ET, Annette Braun

 

ShorthornPlus Bull of the Year- Harmony White Storm, Annette Braun, Mechanicsville, MD.

Junior Bull Calf Champion- Harmony White Storm, Annette Braun

 

 

Southeast Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: GCC Evolution Charm 7102 ET, Kolten Greenhorn, Bellbrook, OH.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: RFSS Roan Margie ET, Evea Ennis, Martinsville, IN.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- CF TF No Foolin 897 UR X ET, Camryn Clapp

Early Spring Heifer Calf Res. Champion- Bratcher Myrtle Bo 812 ET, Craig Bratcher

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- GAF Miss Sassy 2518, Jake Ozburn

Junior Heifer Calf Reserve Champion- Martindell Dreams 801, Austin Martin

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- Martindell Lily 787, Austin Martin

Intermediate Champion Female- GCC Evolution Charm 7102 ET, Kolten Greenhorn

Intermediate Reserve Champion Female- RFSS Roan Margie ET, Evea Ennis

Junior Champion Female- VSC Fancy Margie 60, Mitch Williams

Senior Champion Female- RFSS Roan Sis, Mattie Williams

Senior Reserve Champion Female- VSC Destiny Best Asset 57, Molly Williams

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year- EGL Neptune MX 759, Evea Ennis, Martinsville, IN.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV, Saxonburg, PA.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- VVCC Rocky, Valley Vista Farms

Early Spring Bull Calf Res. Champion- DFF Revolution, Lanie Sutherland

Junior Bull Calf Champion- White Lightning 21MV ET, Cheyenne Cattle Company

Senior Bull Calf Champion- EGL Neptune MX 759, Evea Ennis

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- MFK Last Dance 387K X, Maurice & Faye Korthaus

Intermediate Champion Bull- VCC Ain’t No Foolin’ 1701 ET, Vollborn Cattle Company & Cedar Lane Farm

Senior Champion Bull- Armstrong Easy Rider 1603, John M. Allen, IV

Senior Reserve Champion Bull- MFK Hot Rebel 26K X, Wesley Maurice Korthaus

 

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- 4D Mae Lynn D21E, Rachel Drumm, Winchester, KY.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- Martindell Lily 839, Austin Martin, Tompkinsville, KY.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- Martindell Lily 839, Austin Martin

Intermediate Champion Female- Circle J Mabel 005E, Austin Martin

Junior Champion Female- SharBen Lil Miss Can’t Be Wrong, Adymae Williams

Senior Champion Female- 4D Mae Lynn D21E, Rachel Drumm

 

North Central Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: DSF Esther 4F, Nathan Studer & Jenny Sruder, Creston, IA.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: Bergs Sweet Katie, Madeline Berg, Osage, IA.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- DVW 24 Roses 318, Wasinger Cattle Company

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- DSF Esther 4F, Nathan Studer & Jenny Studer

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- Bergs Crystal’s Sally, Lauren Berg

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- Homedale June Rosewood 7806, Samantha Jo Jabs

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- Homedale June Rosewood 7789, Lane Thomas Jabs

Intermediate Champion Female- Bergs Sweet Katie, Madeline Berg

Intermediate Res. Champion Female- Homedale MLS Max Rosa 7790, Elizabeth Jabs

Junior Champion Female- DSF Missie 104E, Rose Family

Senior Champion Female- DSF Sonya 11E, Brock David Studer

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: JS Continental Divide, Blake Lehman, Eureka, IL & James R. Johnson, Niantic, IL.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: 6B’s Guardian ET, 6B Farms, Allison, IA.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- Bergs Red Duke, Madeline Berg

Early Spring Bull Calf Res. Champion- Studer’s Forsyth 65F. Nathan Studer & Jenny Studer

Junior Bull Calf Champion- Studer’s Fairgame 6F, Brock David Studer

Junior Champion Bull- JS Continental Divide, Blake Lehman & James R. Johnson

Senior Champion Bull- 6B’s Guardian ET, 6B Farms

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year- SULL Black Cherri 7217E ET, Jake Brandt, Clarion, IA.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up- WGR Midnight Mirgage 708E, Mikayla Wetzel, Faribault, MN.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- 6B Nan 18, 6B Farms

Intermediate Champion Female- WGR Midnight Mirgage 708E, Mikayla Wetzel

Junior Champion Female- SULL Black Cherri 7217E ET, Jake Brandt

 

South Central Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: SULL Lucy 7686E ET, Dayson Cash, Fay, OK.

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: RSF Simply Dessert Rose 3E, Ryan Lane, Siloam Springs, AR.

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Late Spring Heifer Calf Champion- 2GS Cumberland 523F, Garrison Spooner

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- M&E Mary’s Cumberland 952, M & E Shorthorns

Early Spring Heifer Calf Res. Champion- JVCC Miss Margie, Luke Jones

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- LDB Magic Rain 801 ET, Brittany Blankinship

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- M&E Cumberland 948, M & E Shorthorns

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- SULL Lucy 7686E ET, Dayson Cash

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- WHR Queen of Sonny 7N15 ET, Carolyn Norris

Intermediate Champion Female- RSF Simply Dessert Rose 3E, Ryan Lane

Intermediate Res. Champion Female- AF Lassies Rose 1725, Merideth Behrens

Junior Champion Female- Simple Brilliance, Lane Blankinship

Junior Res. Champion Female- LH Dee Licious 0317, L H Show Cattle

Senior Champion Female- DTR Mona Lisa 701E, Josie Heter

Senior Res. Champion Female- TRN Foxxy 687 ET, Graham Spooner

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: Fieser’s Mr. Impact 517, Dayson Cash, Fay, OK & Fieser’s Polled Shorthorns, Plains, KS.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- DCL Margie’s Swagger, Dayson Cash

Junior Bull Calf Champion- J&M Maxim Silver ET, J & M Shorthorns

Senior Bull Calf Champion- Fieser’s Ranger, Cash-Farms Shorthorns

Senior Bull Calf Reserve Champion- K’s Zepplin 717, L H Show Cattle

Intermediate Champion Bull- Fieser’s Rookie, Cash-Farms Shorthorns

Junior Champion Bull- Fieser’s Mr. Impact 517, Dayson Cash & Fieser’s Polled Shorthorns

Senior Champion Bull- TJH Bo’s Maxim H7, Crow Creek Farms

 

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year: JVCC Red Diamond 701, Kadin Kinder Worthington, El Reno, OK.

ShorthornPlus Female Runner-Up: Miss Star Knite, Kadin Kinder Worthington, El Reno, OK.

 

ShorthornPlus Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf- Ms. Annie, Ashlyn Larman

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- LDB Cowgirl’s Phoebe 805, Lane Blankinship

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- CCF Violet C01F, Buck Downum

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- AJC Classy Stella, AJ Show Cattle

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- LDB Reckless Mulan 803, Lane Blankinship

Intermediate Champion Female- Miss Star Knite, Kadin Kinder Worthington

Intermediate Res. Champion Female- DTR Ruby Rock Candy 758E, Josie Heter

Junior Champion Female- JVCC Red Diamond 701, Kadin Kinder Worthington

Junior Res. Champion Female- Ms. Laney, Ashlyn Larman

Senior Champion Female- CCR Pepper, Madyson Nunn

 

ShorthornPlus Bull of the Year: CCF Nicholas C59E, Crow Creek Farms, Lawton, OK.

ShorthornPlus Bull Runner-Up (TIE): FSC Mr. Fireball, Brett Forgy, Caddo, OK

CRC Little Boy Blue 12D, TSW Cattle, Marlow, OK

 

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- FSC Mr. Fireball, Brett Forgy

Junior Bull Calf Champion- CCF Paxton C14F, Crow Creek Farms

Senior Bull Calf Champion- CCF Nicholas C59E, Crow Creek Farms

Senior Champion Bull- CRC Little Boy Blue 12D, TSW Cattle

 

 

West Region Winners:

Shorthorn Female of the Year: LC Augusta Pat 2728, Catherine Heather, Sanger, CA

Shorthorn Female Runner-Up: LC Augusta Pat 2817, Don Cardey, Turlock, CA

 

Shorthorn Female Division Winners:

Early Spring Heifer Calf Champion- LC Augusta Pat 2817, Don Cardey

Junior Heifer Calf Champion- LC Augusta Pat 2728, Catherine Heather

Junior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- LC Welcome Lady 2704, Don Cardey

Senior Heifer Calf Champion- JT Betty Angel 2564, J T Ranch

Senior Heifer Calf Res. Champion- LC Augusta Pat 2667, Don Cardey

Intermediate Champion Female- GSC Rosie Ransom 2503, Greg Cardey

Intermediate Reserve Champion Female- JT Betty Angel 2472, J T Ranch

Junior Champion Female- LC Augusta Pat 2385, Don Cardey

Junior Reserve Champion Female- JT Betty Angel 2334, J T Ranch

Senior Champion Female- GSC Princess 2222, Greg Cardey

Senior Reserve Champion Female- LC Funny Face 2300, Don Cardey

Cow/Calf Champion- GSC Sweetheart 1311, Greg Cardey

Reserve Cow/Calf Champion- LC Augusta Pat 1383, Don Cardey

 

Shorthorn Bull of the Year: GSC Studer 2259, Greg Cardey, Turlock, CA.

Shorthorn Bull Runner-Up: GSC Gold Label 2148, Greg Cardey, Turlock, CA.

 

Shorthorn Bull Division Winners:

Early Spring Bull Calf Champion- GSC Studer 2865, Greg Cardey

Junior Bull Calf Champion- LC Gold Label 2685, Don Cardey

Junior Bull Calf Res. Champion- JT Studer 2725, J T Ranch

Senior Bull Calf Champion- GSC Gold Label 2585, Greg Cardey

Senior Bull Calf Res. Champion- LC Studer 2563, Don Cardey

Intermediate Champion Bull- LC Studer 2464, Don Cardey

Intermediate Res. Champion Bull- GSC Studer 2419, Greg Cardey

Junior Champion Bull- GSC Studer 2259, Greg Cardey

Junior Reserve Champion Bull- LC Gold Label 2263, Don Cardey

Senior Champion Bull- GSC Gold Label 2148, Greg Cardey

 

ShorthornPlus Female of the Year: PHF Idaho Duchess 294E, Arielle Phillips, Caldwell, ID

Intermediate Champion Female- PHF Idaho Duchess 294E, Arielle Phillips

ASA BOARD MODIFIES MISSION STATEMENT, VISIONS AND CORE VALUES

At the end of February, the American Shorthorn Association board of directors met in Kansas City for a strategic planning session led by Kevin Oschner. During the session, the board revised the ASA mission statement, vision, core values and core strategies.

The new mission statement is “the mission of the American Shorthorn Association is to serve all members and enhance the value of the Shorthorn breed by managing data, maintaining the integrity of the herdbook, educating members and communicating the value of Shorthorn cattle resulting in the expanded use of Shorthorn genetics in the U.S. beef industry.”

The new ASA vision is to be recognized in the industry as a viable British breed that creates profitability in beef cattle production, with a family-friendly environment.

The new ASA core values are diversity: we value diversity of members and breeding programs, transparency: we value the importance of a transparent database and herdbook, family: we value programs and activities that encourage and support family-based beef production, accountability: we believe its important for individuals to take ownership of their actions and decisions, honesty and integrity: we believe that strong relationships are based on personal honesty and integrity, technology: we value the role technology plays in advancing beef production and the Shorthorn breed, heritage/history: we celebrate the rich history of the Shorthorn breed, and customer service: we commit ourselves to treating our members like valued customers.

The new ASA core strategies are to increase commercial interest in Shorthorn genetics, educate, equip & empower our members, continue to develop & support the junior program, and invest in research & development to enable breed improvement.

“This strategic planning session was truly valuable in updating our association to fit how we have grown and will continue to grow as a breed including prioritizing the importance of the Shorthorn breed in the commercial cattle industry,” said Montie D. Soules, executive secretary/CEO of ASA. “The board spent two days planning to make sure we were including all current and future members of the ASA so that we can serve them to the best of our ability.”

The Importance of a Unified Breed

I would like to address some questions that members have been asking ASA board members. I hope the comments and information provided in this Association Outlook will resolve some of these inquiries.

There appears to be concerns from some breeders or membership regarding how much funding is being spent on commercial advertising vs. show promotion. This is easy to answer; the numbers don’t lie. I am going to be a little like the infomercials we see on TV and tease you by addressing some issues before getting to your answer.

First, I hope that as a Shorthorn breeder or member you agree that the most important part of any promotional campaign is that Shorthorn cattle are being publicized which of course, helps the breed. When the breed is exposed, all Shorthorn breeder’s benefit.

The promotion of show ring animals vs. commercial or bull production question originates with breeders who are devoting their resources to one or the other. I understand their interest is directed to the marketing that benefits their personal operational agenda. I want to assure all members and all breeders that the ASA has many members whose purpose in raising Shorthorn cattle is not the same. It is the position of the ASA, staff and Board of Directors that we provide customer service for the needs of all membership as much as possible. It is also important to provide a united front as a breed. This business of only looking at the breed as a show ring breed or a commercial breed will present failure in the future. It is time to have a united focus that betters all segments of the breed and respects each other’s choices or reasons to raise Shorthorn cattle. True breed growth will only transpire when we as a membership show respect and present a unified image.

In the Hereford breed when the polled association and the Hereford (horned) association merged, the ranks were sharply divided, and it took years to overcome. Only after each group conceded some devout beliefs and narrow views, did each segment gain respect for the other. The breed united and flourished. And, as their breed became more commercially accepted, their show type animals sored in price and the breed grew in popularity. If we evaluate other breeds in the industry the same type of progression transpired. It is important to have a commercial base under a breed for all involved to reap the benefits.

Now, to answer the original questions. First, the audit for the past fiscal year, showed the ASA spent $108,000 on breed promotion last year this is up from $78,000 the previous year. All show expenses, premium monies, and advertising of any type that benefit the breed are included in the total for breed promotion. Last fiscal year, 45% of total breed promotion was spent on show promotion and expenses. The remaining 55% went to general ASA advertising; including commercial advertising. When I go back to 2016-2017 fiscal year, the $78,000 breaks out very similarly, with around 46% being shows and expenses with the remaining 54% for general ASA advertising; including commercial advertising. Both gross breed promotion amounts include all co-op advertising contributed by the ASA. Perhaps some of these questions arose because the American Rancher shows primarily feature commercial type operations. Just so everyone knows, the time each breeder gets on the show is paid for by that breeder. It is their time to tell the industry about what they do. Some who have paid to be part of this program would be considered both commercial and show operations. Yes, they do exist – breeders who are doing both. They produce commercial cattle and show cattle, and market both. If you are interested in participating in a future American Rancher show, please feel free to contact me.

The next question may be how many ASA members are show and how many are commercial. There is really no way to determine this number. We are all members of the ASA and the goal we have in common is to promote the Shorthorn breed. The vast majority of the animals exhibited at ASA national shows are ET born calves. Around 10% of all registrations are ET calves and around 50% of those are shown at national shows. There are many, many breeders who do both – run a commercial operation and support the regional show system, state fairs and/or county fairs – an important function that keeps Shorthorn in front of the industry at the grass roots level. These folks fall into a combination show-commercial group. The ASA does not have this type of information showing how many breeders are combination show-commercial operations. Polling from the 2015 Impact Conference does show that a majority of our membership/breeders most likely fall into this category as a combination show-commercial operation.

As an Association and Board of Directors we want to be transparent. Everyone wants what is best for the ASA and the Shorthorn breed, your Board and staff work every day to try and maintain that. Many things are changing in our industry and will continue to change. It becomes important for us to make the adjustments that keep us up to speed with the technology our industry provides. I believe our breed is making good strides with new memberships and producing quality Shorthorn cattle. The selection process of improving the cattle in our breed is always evolving. The animals we see in the show ring today contribute to the commercial industry and bull market. The bulls being raised contribute to the show ring. It is important that we maintain this crossover and united front as breed. Remember, we are judged by both the show ring and our bull sales and it is equally important that both excel and provide a similar type of animal that can contribute to all segments.

Together, we are the American Shorthorn Association!

Written by: Montie Soules, Executive Secretary/CEO

An In-Depth Look at Selection Indices: Part 3

We’ve reached the finale in the series of articles discussing the lineup of available selection indices for Shorthorn breeders and customers. After covering the basics of what goes into a selection index in January, and further explaining $Calving Ease and $Feedlot in February, March finds us with two final pieces of the index puzzle to piece together: $British Maternal Index ($BMI) and $Fescue.

$British Maternal Index

The written definition of $BMI on the ASA website is as follows:

“This multi-trait selection index attempts to measure a bull’s potential profitability when complimenting the British cow base (Angus, Red Angus, Hereford, etc.) in a maternal breeding program. Shorthorn females can likewise be gauged at adding value to British or British-composite bulls of other breeds. A balance of growth (WW) and carcass traits (REA, Fat, MB) are desired with a strong maternal component (CED, Milk, CEM) aimed at moderate mature size (YW), optimum reproductive efficiency and cow longevity.”

A few points of emphasis can be gleaned from this Websteresque definition. First and foremost, you can figure out that there are several traits of interest included in $BMI. In a more comprehensive scenario like this one, there are more traits that become involved. I think you will notice that the production situation outlined in this index is more complex than $Feedlot, and certainly more involved than $Calving Ease. Many of America’s commercial cattle producers have their programs set up with management similar to what is described in $BMI: British-based cows, selling calves at weaning, and retaining replacements heifers.

With most commercial cattlemen selling calves at weaning, the economic drivers of this sector of their enterprise are ive calves and pounds of calf at weaning. With that in mind, it makes perfect sense for the CED and WW EPDs to play a significant part of $BMI. Weaning weight has arguably the most significant impact on $BMI of any included traits. When retaining females for the breeding herd, they need to be able to have a live calf, produce milk to raise that calf, and do so in a moderate mature size. While we have EPDs to measure two of these 3 traits (CEM and Milk), we have to use YW as an indicator trait for mature size since there is a not current EPD for mature cow weight in the Shorthorn genetic evaluation. A higher YW EPD has a more negative impact on $BMI, as bigger YW indicates a larger mature cow size. Even though it is not a direct point of emphasis in the scenario outlined for $BMI, carcass traits (REA, Fat, Marb) do play a role in the calculation, albeit smaller than the other traits outlined. Once these cattle are sold at weaning and enter the feedlot, the ones with the genetic capability to perform on the rail become more valuable to feeders.

When the $BMI index was developed, The American Shorthorn Association did not have a Stayability EPD to include in $BMI. Obviously, the ability of a female to stay in the cow herd productively has an impact on her ability to add profit to the ranch’s bottom line. Like I mentioned in the previous article for $Feedlot, it’s not as easy to edit an index as to just stick the Stayability EPD into the $BMI formula and it still work properly. There have been several discussions amongst staff, ASA BOD and breeders involved in ASA committees on the best way to improve this index going forward.

$Fescue

The youngest and most unique member of the Shorthorn index lineup is $Fescue. The components of $Fescue are very similar to $BMI, but with an added genomic piece to the puzzle. The addition of $Fescue is only for those animals who have had the Fescue Tolerance T-Snip test that is offered by AgBotanica performed and recorded with ASA. The test results are reported on a 0-50 scale, with cattle scoring a 50 considered to be most tolerant of toxic fescue. Research from AgBotanica indicates that cows with incrementally higher scores for the fescue tolerance test weaned off heavier calves than those with lower scores (40s weaned off heavier calves than 30s, who weaned off heavier than 20s, etc.)

The methodology behind $Fescue includes the calculation of $BMI with the Fescue Tolerance test score incorporated into the equation as a weighted factor. With the research conducted by AgBotanica showing how much of an effect the score has on weaning weight produced, it was possible to weight the score into a selection index. The most logical piece to incorporate with $Fescue is $BMI, as a production scenario that is most likely to be impacted by grazing toxic fescue is a cow/calf situation like the one outlined for $BMI.

Wrap Up
With this look into the components of each selection index that is offered to ASA members, hopefully you now have a better idea of what makes up these tools and have more confidence to use them in your mating decisions. As always, these are just a few of the available tools out there to help you breed better cattle. A tool is only useful if it’s used properly, and only using one tool to try and do a complex job (like breeding cattle) can prove very difficult. Use your knowledge of your herd, in addition to the available tools like EPDs and selection indices, to make the most informed decision.

Written by Matt Woolfolk, Director of Performance Programs

2017 ASA/University of Illinois Sire Test Performance Review

A journey that has been several years in the making reached its destination just before Christmas when the first calf crop from the ASA National Sire Test (NST) at the University of Illinois were harvested. The process of cultivating the opportunity with Dr. Dan Shike at U of I from the day that the cattle were harvested, following this plan through to fruition has been no simple task for the Shorthorn breed. My hats off to all the breeders, ASA board members, and staff who were able to get this program initiated in 2016. I have enjoyed being able to work with this program since coming on board at ASA, but it would not have been such a seamless transition if not for all the groundwork and foresight in establishing the program. With all this data and information collected, I’m sure one of the prevailing questions is “What did we learn from this test?” In my mind, that’s a complex question with multiple solutions (which I’ll try to answer later on). Depending on your perspective, there’s several takeaways that can be gleaned from these test results. I will share some of my thoughts and perspective, but ultimately, I think that everyone should study this data and form their own opinions. Read more about the Performance Review