STATE ASSOCIATION CO-OP ADVERTISING PROGRAM UPDATED GUIDELINES

STATE ASSOCIATION CO-OP ADVERTISING PROGRAM

  1. The state association coop advertising program is designed to help ASA and state associations share the cost of promoting the Shorthorn breed.
  2. Advertisement requests must be made by state association’s president, vice-president or secretary manager. Advertisements cannot be requested by groups of breeders or individuals.
  3. The ASA will reimburse 50% of the ad cost, up to a total of $650 per state per fiscal year.
  4. There are limited coop funds available for states in each fiscal year. No more coop ads will be funded when available funds have been utilized.
  5. Each state association must pay advertisement and send paid invoice to ASA to be reimbursed. ASA encourages the state association to include a copy of the ad placed with paid invoice.
  6. ASA will have 4 general ad choices and 2 contract ads for state associations to choose from. ASA encourages states to use contract ads for more Shorthorn promotion throughout the year.
    1. General Ads are a minimum of a quarter page in size and not larger than a full page in size.
    2. Contract Ads cannot be smaller than 1 column by 2 inches.
    3. Ads will have space to include the state association logo and contact information.
    4. Ads will include the ASA logo and contact information.
    5. Ads can include state events, dates and locations but not individual breeder information and dates.
    6. All ad requests must be submitted to ASA at least 5 business days before deadline. Ads will not be eligible for ad copy approval if received less than 10 business days before deadline.
  7. State Associations must provide the following ad specs to the ASA.
    1. Publication name, phone number and email address
    2. Ad Deadline
    3. Ad Size
    4. Full Color or Black & White
    5. State Association information to be included in ad
  8. State associations are required to meet above guidelines in order to be eligible to receive reimbursement for coop ads.

Guidelines updated September 26, 2018

KY State Fair Super Regional

On Friday, August 24, 2018, Shorthorn exhibitors showed at the Kentucky State Fair. The Super Regional Show was judged by Josh Taylor of Perkins, OK. Taylor evaluated 32 purebred females, 9 purebred bulls and 14 ShorthornPlus females.

Grand Champion Female was awarded to BRH Proud Fool 1720 shown by Caroline Winter of Ashville, OH.

Reserve Grand Champion Female honors went to GCC Evolution Charm 7102 ET, exhibited by Kolten Greenhorn of Waynesville, OH.

Grand Champion Bull was Armstrong Easy Rider 1603 exhibited by John Allen IV of Saxonburg, PA.

Reserve Grand Champion Bull was EGL Neptune MX 759 exhibited by Eva Ennis of Martinsville, IN.

In the ShorthornPlus show, Grand Champion Female honors went to 4D Mae Lynn D21E shown by Rachel Drumm of Winchester, KY.

Reserve Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female was LCF Roxie Diamond 727 exhibited by Reba Prather of Nancy, KY.

Adios Interns

Today marks the last day of our internship here in Kansas City. It’s been a whirlwind of a time learning about the association, working with junior members and planning Junior Nationals and the IGS Summit. These summer months have flown by and we are going to miss all of the staff members in the office, but we are leaving with some great memories and experiences. Working in a breed association has been the perfect opportunity to help us grow in our professional skills and give us a look into career possibilities. Everyone in the office has been so welcoming and helpful, and we are grateful for the friendly atmosphere we were able to work in.

 

For our last day, we decided to throw a potluck brunch. This year, for the Beef Cook-Off contest at Junior Nationals, the key ingredient was steak. We decided to center our dish around this cut of beef and thought breakfast burritos would be the perfect way to start our last day. After searing the steak on the stove, we added some scrambled eggs and bundled the mix up in individual flour tortillas. Shelby brought potatoes as her side dish, which made for a great addition to the burritos. After a healthy dose of some salsa and cheese, the perfect burrito was born and the fiesta began!

 

Once everyone had eaten their body weight in burritos and side dishes, it was time for Anna and Emily Dyes to return to college for their final year of school, and Emily Meinhardt for her junior year. Our time here may have seemed short, but we will remember our experiences for a long time to come.

Weekend in Cow Town

Emily Meinhardt

My first trip to the historic “Cow Town” was definitely a memorable one. Summit offered so many great opportunities to grow your industry knowledge, experience the Stockyards and see breeders’ operations. For me, getting to know people and making connections always ends up being my favorite part. I loved getting to meet kids my age across the different breeds, along with learning about their breeds by attending the ranch tours. I am not much of a history geek, but I found the Stockyard history very interesting to learn with the impact Fort Worth had on the cattle industry. This is a great opportunity that I believe every junior should take advantage of.

 

Anna Miller

I was excited to attend Summit this year because it was held in the historic Stockyards of Fort Worth, Texas. The Stockyards has such a fun atmosphere, and there is so much western expansion history in the area that it makes for an interesting visit. My favorite part of Summit was being able to interact with the juniors on a more personal level compared to junior nationals. In Madison, I mostly dealt with the junior members on paper and didn’t have many opportunities to get to know them. However, at Summit I was in charge of icebreakers and group activities. This gave me more of a chance to interact with members from across the three different associations. My family raises Red Angus cattle, so it was interesting for me to tour ranches from three different breeds that I am not as familiar with. Overall, Summit was a blast and felt more like a vacation than a weekend of work!

 

Emily Dyes

For me, one of the highlights of our trip to Fort Worth was the quick tour we had of the Stockyards. I grew up in Texas and have been to the Stockyards numerous times, but I still found it interesting to learn about the role that Fort Worth played in shaping the cattle industry and learned a lot of facts I didn’t previously know. A fact I learned was that cattle were only worth four dollars in San Antonio area and worth $40 in Kansas City — it definitely makes sense why everyone was moving cattle up the Chisholm Trail! Also, Bonnie and Clyde stayed at the Stockyards Hotel, so it was pretty cool to be in a building they once were in.

College Tips from the Interns

College can be overwhelming and stressful at points. Here are some of our tips to make sure you have a successful semester at college.

  1. Get involved.

There is an organization for everyone at college. Try out several organizations and find a couple that fit for you. Getting involved in organizations within your major is a great way to make connections with other students, faculty and even alumni. Be careful because it is easy to get over involved — make sure to find a few organizations that work with your schedule.

  1. Get to know your professors and faculty within your department.

Getting to know those involved in your department can open a lot of doors for you. Professors are more likely to lend a helping hand to a familiar face, whether it be with class-related things or helping with connections. If you can, try to sit in the front row of your classes so professors get used to seeing your face and notice your presence!

  1. Take advantage of a free meal when you can get it.

You would be surprised with  how many free meals you can get in college! My freshman year I was living on campus and at least once a week (normally more) there would be an organization giving out free pizza or social nights with free ice cream. Definitely take advantage of these! Money will get tighter during your college days, so anything free is a plus and it’s also a great way socialize.

  1. Learn your way of studying.

Studying can be difficult, especially if you never had to study in high school. It is important to find your way of studying early on in your college career. This might be reviewing before you go to each class, or maybe it’s making flashcards. Find a strategy that works for you that you can stick with.

  1. Study abroad.

Studying abroad is a great opportunity to get out of your comfort zone, while also experiencing different cultures. Study abroad agricultural programs allow you to experience different scales of agriculture and production methods you are unfamiliar with. You would be surprised with how different the world varies in agricultural practices.

  1. Attend networking events.

Networking can often seem intimidating and nerve-racking, but it is an essential skill to learn. Try attending events as soon as you can, even as a freshman, so you can practice your skills connecting with others. If your school hosts career fairs, attend and talk to recruiters for practice, even if you aren’t looking for a job right away. This will make you feel more comfortable in the future when you begin seriously looking for a job.

  1. Find a balance.

This can make or break you when you go to college. You need to figure out how to balance schoolwork with social life, working, and trying to stay healthy. It’s not always easy, but once you adjust to being on your own and making your own choices you’ll be fine!

  1. Sleep is important.

Sometimes you can get so overwhelmed with school, work, activities and studying you forget an important factor in it all: sleep. All-nighters are necessary at some points, but not constantly. Know the amount of sleep you need to be productive during the day.

  1. Find a buddy in each class.

This can be the most important one at times. You never know when you’ll need to miss class and notes. Also, study buddies are a great reso

urce to learn from each other.

  1. Your friends will change, and that’s okay.

It’s important to know you may not stay best friends with people you grew up with just because you go to the same college. Do try to stay in contact and don’t forget about your hometown friends, but don’t be afraid to branch out and be open minded to making new friends.

Essentials for a Successful Week

Only 6 more days until we are all “Under the Big Top” in Madison, Wisconsin! Here in the office we are packing things up and figured we would remind you all about the essentials you need to survive the week.

As you pack your trailer to head to Junior Nationals here is a tune (and show packing list) for you to listen to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qS8nU9qxVTk.

ESSENTIALS:

                                                      WATER

HYDRATE. HYDRATE. HYDRATE. Make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day. Days in the barn can get long and will be even longer if you’re not properly hydrated.

 

SNACKS

Busy days at Junior Nationals can cause kids to get “Hangry.” Be sure to pack all your favorite snacks. Here is a list of our favorite snacks at cattle shows:

Emily M.: Grapes, Chex Mix, Pringles

Anna: Pita Chips, Hummus, Salami

Emily D.: Cheese sticks, Cheez-Its, Cinnamon Rolls

 

COMFORTABLE SHOES

Standing on cement all day can be hard on the feet. Be sure to pack a variety of shoes to switch out from day to day. You will appreciate this decision later in the week.

 

HAIR

Your cattle’s hair typically always comes first, so remember Revive and brushes to make sure their hair is on point for the show ring. Next, your hair. Rain is in the forecast!! Hats are a lifesaver on rainy days, or even days you just want to sleep in an extra 10 minutes.

 

REGISTRATION PAPERS

Don’t get to check-in and end up getting the “YOU HAD ONE JOB” look. Make sure those registration papers and health papers are in a safe spot to bring to check-in.

 

PROJECTS

Don’t forget to pack those projects you have spent countless hours on! Make sure to bring extra supplies, just in case something gets messed up on the drive!

 

POSITIVE ATTITUDE

The most important thing to pack along: a positive attitude. Cattle shows call for early mornings and late evenings, but a positive attitude always makes it more enjoyable. This week is about making memories that you’ll cherish for a life time, while making new friends along the way.

 

Hope we could help with your preparation for Junior Nationals! Safe travels as you make your way to Madison!

Be in the Know About Junior Nationals Rules

Time has flown by and we are excited to meet you all in Madison in just a short 12 days. As you do any last-minute polishing to your projects for Junior Nationals we have some tips to help you make sure you are properly prepared.

Cattle Check-In

  • Weigh In: All cattle must come to check-in. Each animal will be weighed in.
  • Health Requirements: Be sure to read up on Wisconsin Health Requirements. They will heavily examine for warts and ringworm. A vet will be at check-in to check health papers and inspect animals.

Arts & Crafts, Photography, Promotional Poster and Graphic Design

  • Think out of the box: Create/capture things that describe your personality and you will use in the future. The project is always more special when it means something to you, plus judges like to see your personality shine out through your projects.
  • Options: Always have several options to choose from, then narrow it down. Be sure to gather opinions from other people if you’re stumped, but remember your opinion is always the most important.
  • Attention grabber: First impressions are everything, when the judges see you project you want it to stick out and be unique.
  • Come prepared: Be sure to fill out your name tag and statement of originality, so that check-in goes smoothly.
  • Reminder: All exhibits should promote the Shorthorn breed.

Cattlemen’s Written Test

  • Try something new: This is a new contest this year! Step out of your comfort zone and test your knowledge.
  • Come prepared: Don’t come into the test blindsided; study beef industry and Shorthorn breed facts.

Mentor Apprentice

  • Meet a new friend: A great rule to live by is to is meet three new friends at every show you go to, no matter what their age is. Attend Youth Conference I to either get pair with a younger member or older member for the week. This is a great way to get involved and meet new people from other states.

Showmanship

  • Presentation: Although this is a no-fit showmanship competition, make sure your animal is clean and ready to walk in the show ring.
  • Confidence: Be sure to bring confidence to the show ring to show the judge you are comfortable with your animal. This is a major thing judges look for.
  • Be on time! Make sure you give yourself plenty of time to prepare you animal. Each judge moves at their own pace, keep an eye on how on the speed of the judge so you know when to have your animal ready.
  • Senior Showmanship: The top 10 seniors will complete the showmanship competition by fitting and then showing their animal at the conclusion of the day. Competitors will receive 45 minutes to fit their animal.
  • Reminders:
  • Bulls cannot be shown
  • There’s a peewee competition for Juniors under the age of 5
  • You must use the same animal throughout the competition

Team Salesmanship and Speech

  • What is the Judge looking for?
    • Confidence: Own what you know. Present all your information with confidence. Make sure you are speaking clearly and loudly. This shows that know what you are talking about and are proud of your work.
    • Eye contact: Making the appropriate amount of eye contact is important when presenting. Practice at home presenting to a group of people so you feel comfortable.

Reminders:

  • The judges will ask questions
  • Dress for Speech Contest: prospectors are school clothes, seniors are semi-formal.
  • Team Salesmanship: You must be there 20 minutes before your scheduled time.

Fitting

  • Teamwork: Know each team members strengths and weaknesses, then assign each job to the appropriate team member based off that.
  • Plan ahead: Make a plan with each team member, so it is clear they know what they will be doing. Divide it up so everyone has a job and is always working. A strong plan will make it, so the 30 minutes run smoothly and efficient.
  • Keep it clean: Keep your area clean so the judges can easily get around and examine your teams work.

Reminders:

  • Animals may enter the ring with a show halter in the prospector division only.
  • Don’t forget any of your supplies, generators are encouraged to make sure you have enough power.
  • Team members may be from any state as this doesn’t go towards the outstanding State award.

Judging

  • Things to know: The contest is scheduled to include 4 cattle classes (12 minutes per class). There will be 10 questions. PI will only judge two classes and then be dismissed.

Not signed up as an exhibitor for Junior Nationals? But you are a member of the American Junior Shorthorn Association? You can still compete in the contests! Just pay the exhibitor fee and sign up at Junior Nationals!

Our goal is to make this the “Greatest Show on Earth” for all ages. For kids 5 or under there’s still lots of fun activities to participate in “Under the Big Top”!  Sign up at http://signup.com/go/BRpDHqm.

Hope we could answer any last–minute questions for this year’s Junior National contests. Take a look at the Edge so you’re aware of all the contest rules. If you have any more questions regarding any of the contests or need tips and advice feel free to contact us here at the office!

 

Roll Up. Roll Up. The circus is coming.

 Our names are Emily, Emily and Anna and we will be the entertainers (interns) for this summer’s show. The main event is scheduled to come to Madison, Wisconsin on June 26. Our entertainment is something you won’t want to miss and we are excited to meet you all “Under the Big Top.” The entertainers and the rest of the crew here at ASA have been busy preparing for this journey to NJSS; prepare for “The Greatest Show on Earth.”

Entertainer Emily:

Hello attendees! “The Greatest Show on Earth” is in full swing here at ASA. This week I have been focusing on my balance for my main performance, Trapeze. In preparation for the circus, I have been creating the circus programs (exhibitor folders), along with making graphics and posts for the social media pages. The office is full of energy and I have loved getting to know the rest of the crew. Coming from a small-town it has been a struggle to find our way around Kansas City. We have got lost approximately 10 times, but we are getting better. I can’t wait to be “Under the Big Top” in just a few short weeks with you all!

Entertainer Anna:

Hi everyone, I’m excited to join all the other acts “Under the Big Top” of the American Shorthorn Association! This week has kept me very busy prepping for contests as well as keeping my beard well-moisturized for my grand performances. Although all this hair can get in the way while typing up contest revisions, I’ve had a great time getting to know my fellow performers in the office. I haven’t seen much of Kansas City yet, but I’m hoping to venture into the city this weekend to check out the City Market, as well as scope out a good beauty salon for a deep conditioning. I can’t wait to get this show on the road! I would end with a beard joke, but I’ll shave it for later.

Entertainer Emily:

Hey Everyone, I hope you have all booked your tickets (entered) for the “Greatest Show on Earth” in Madison, Wisconsin! I have been walking a tightrope all week sorting through exhibitors and cattle to insure everyone is properly accommodated. It’s been interesting working with all of the circus freaks, but it’s been extremely fun so far and I’m excited to get on the road for the circus (Junior Nationals)! Next week I will be sending out conformation emails of who will be in attendance for the circus. After confirmations, if you have any questions about entries feel free to contact myself or the ringleader (Shelby Rogers) at any time.

 

The show takes place in 26 day and we are excited for you to join us!

 

2017 ASA/University of Illinois Sire Test Early Results

Early results are in from the 2017 ASA Sire Test with the University of Illinois, and Shorthorn genetics look to be proving their mettle in a real-world commercial setting. Even though they are heavily involved in cow-calf research, the University of Illinois runs their cow herd as close to a no-nonsense commercial operation as you will find in any university system. It’s a great opportunity to work with cattle that are forced to work in tight breeding seasons, have quality udders, and maintain themselves while raising a calf on minimal supplementation. A special thanks to the breeders who participated in the 2017 Sire Test. Without your support, we wouldn’t be able to gather this valuable information that will help move the Shorthorn breed towards our goals of growing commercial acceptance for our cattle. From September 8- October 4, 151 Shorthorn-sired calves were born, with 91% of the calves born in the 17 day window from September 13- September 30. Using UI’s SimAngus cow herd resulted in 123 black-hided calves, 15 black calves with white markings/blue roans, and 13 red hided calves. These calves were raised without creep feed until weaning on February 14, 2018. After some time to precondition the cattle, they will be shipped to the UI Farm near the university campus this month, where they will go on feed. Data collection in this phase of the trial will include gain, feed efficiency, and eventually carcass data. Initial reports indicate that these weights stack up comparably to other calves within the UI herd, showcasing the value of Shorthorns as the British breed crossbreeding solution. Keep in mind that it can be difficult to draw any conclusions comparing groups of extremely small size. Having only 1 or 2 calves may not be a fair representation of a sire’s genetic capabilities. Unfortunately, nature didn’t bless us with perfect distribution of steer and heifer calves across all sires. Weaning weight data listed is adjusted to a 205 day weaning weight. All data has been uploaded to Digital Beef. We are working with UI to plan a field day in August. This will include a chance to see the cattle on feed, as well as educational presentations and fellowship with other Shorthorn breeders. Be sure to look for more information on this event in future issues of the Shorthorn Country. View Full Report Here!

American Rancher featuring Shorthorn Cattle

This is the most recent American Rancher featuring Shorthorn cattle. The ASA slogan ‘Performance with Purpose’ truly describes the Shorthorn breed and the breeders that raise Shorthorn cattle. Check it out!