Weekend in Cow Town

Emily Meinhardt

My first trip to the historic “Cow Town” was definitely a memorable one. Summit offered so many great opportunities to grow your industry knowledge, experience the Stockyards and see breeders’ operations. For me, getting to know people and making connections always ends up being my favorite part. I loved getting to meet kids my age across the different breeds, along with learning about their breeds by attending the ranch tours. I am not much of a history geek, but I found the Stockyard history very interesting to learn with the impact Fort Worth had on the cattle industry. This is a great opportunity that I believe every junior should take advantage of.

 

Anna Miller

I was excited to attend Summit this year because it was held in the historic Stockyards of Fort Worth, Texas. The Stockyards has such a fun atmosphere, and there is so much western expansion history in the area that it makes for an interesting visit. My favorite part of Summit was being able to interact with the juniors on a more personal level compared to junior nationals. In Madison, I mostly dealt with the junior members on paper and didn’t have many opportunities to get to know them. However, at Summit I was in charge of icebreakers and group activities. This gave me more of a chance to interact with members from across the three different associations. My family raises Red Angus cattle, so it was interesting for me to tour ranches from three different breeds that I am not as familiar with. Overall, Summit was a blast and felt more like a vacation than a weekend of work!

 

Emily Dyes

For me, one of the highlights of our trip to Fort Worth was the quick tour we had of the Stockyards. I grew up in Texas and have been to the Stockyards numerous times, but I still found it interesting to learn about the role that Fort Worth played in shaping the cattle industry and learned a lot of facts I didn’t previously know. A fact I learned was that cattle were only worth four dollars in San Antonio area and worth $40 in Kansas City — it definitely makes sense why everyone was moving cattle up the Chisholm Trail! Also, Bonnie and Clyde stayed at the Stockyards Hotel, so it was pretty cool to be in a building they once were in.

College Tips from the Interns

College can be overwhelming and stressful at points. Here are some of our tips to make sure you have a successful semester at college.

  1. Get involved.

There is an organization for everyone at college. Try out several organizations and find a couple that fit for you. Getting involved in organizations within your major is a great way to make connections with other students, faculty and even alumni. Be careful because it is easy to get over involved — make sure to find a few organizations that work with your schedule.

  1. Get to know your professors and faculty within your department.

Getting to know those involved in your department can open a lot of doors for you. Professors are more likely to lend a helping hand to a familiar face, whether it be with class-related things or helping with connections. If you can, try to sit in the front row of your classes so professors get used to seeing your face and notice your presence!

  1. Take advantage of a free meal when you can get it.

You would be surprised with  how many free meals you can get in college! My freshman year I was living on campus and at least once a week (normally more) there would be an organization giving out free pizza or social nights with free ice cream. Definitely take advantage of these! Money will get tighter during your college days, so anything free is a plus and it’s also a great way socialize.

  1. Learn your way of studying.

Studying can be difficult, especially if you never had to study in high school. It is important to find your way of studying early on in your college career. This might be reviewing before you go to each class, or maybe it’s making flashcards. Find a strategy that works for you that you can stick with.

  1. Study abroad.

Studying abroad is a great opportunity to get out of your comfort zone, while also experiencing different cultures. Study abroad agricultural programs allow you to experience different scales of agriculture and production methods you are unfamiliar with. You would be surprised with how different the world varies in agricultural practices.

  1. Attend networking events.

Networking can often seem intimidating and nerve-racking, but it is an essential skill to learn. Try attending events as soon as you can, even as a freshman, so you can practice your skills connecting with others. If your school hosts career fairs, attend and talk to recruiters for practice, even if you aren’t looking for a job right away. This will make you feel more comfortable in the future when you begin seriously looking for a job.

  1. Find a balance.

This can make or break you when you go to college. You need to figure out how to balance schoolwork with social life, working, and trying to stay healthy. It’s not always easy, but once you adjust to being on your own and making your own choices you’ll be fine!

  1. Sleep is important.

Sometimes you can get so overwhelmed with school, work, activities and studying you forget an important factor in it all: sleep. All-nighters are necessary at some points, but not constantly. Know the amount of sleep you need to be productive during the day.

  1. Find a buddy in each class.

This can be the most important one at times. You never know when you’ll need to miss class and notes. Also, study buddies are a great reso

urce to learn from each other.

  1. Your friends will change, and that’s okay.

It’s important to know you may not stay best friends with people you grew up with just because you go to the same college. Do try to stay in contact and don’t forget about your hometown friends, but don’t be afraid to branch out and be open minded to making new friends.

Essentials for a Successful Week

Only 6 more days until we are all “Under the Big Top” in Madison, Wisconsin! Here in the office we are packing things up and figured we would remind you all about the essentials you need to survive the week.

As you pack your trailer to head to Junior Nationals here is a tune (and show packing list) for you to listen to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qS8nU9qxVTk.

ESSENTIALS:

                                                      WATER

HYDRATE. HYDRATE. HYDRATE. Make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day. Days in the barn can get long and will be even longer if you’re not properly hydrated.

 

SNACKS

Busy days at Junior Nationals can cause kids to get “Hangry.” Be sure to pack all your favorite snacks. Here is a list of our favorite snacks at cattle shows:

Emily M.: Grapes, Chex Mix, Pringles

Anna: Pita Chips, Hummus, Salami

Emily D.: Cheese sticks, Cheez-Its, Cinnamon Rolls

 

COMFORTABLE SHOES

Standing on cement all day can be hard on the feet. Be sure to pack a variety of shoes to switch out from day to day. You will appreciate this decision later in the week.

 

HAIR

Your cattle’s hair typically always comes first, so remember Revive and brushes to make sure their hair is on point for the show ring. Next, your hair. Rain is in the forecast!! Hats are a lifesaver on rainy days, or even days you just want to sleep in an extra 10 minutes.

 

REGISTRATION PAPERS

Don’t get to check-in and end up getting the “YOU HAD ONE JOB” look. Make sure those registration papers and health papers are in a safe spot to bring to check-in.

 

PROJECTS

Don’t forget to pack those projects you have spent countless hours on! Make sure to bring extra supplies, just in case something gets messed up on the drive!

 

POSITIVE ATTITUDE

The most important thing to pack along: a positive attitude. Cattle shows call for early mornings and late evenings, but a positive attitude always makes it more enjoyable. This week is about making memories that you’ll cherish for a life time, while making new friends along the way.

 

Hope we could help with your preparation for Junior Nationals! Safe travels as you make your way to Madison!

Be in the Know About Junior Nationals Rules

Time has flown by and we are excited to meet you all in Madison in just a short 12 days. As you do any last-minute polishing to your projects for Junior Nationals we have some tips to help you make sure you are properly prepared.

Cattle Check-In

  • Weigh In: All cattle must come to check-in. Each animal will be weighed in.
  • Health Requirements: Be sure to read up on Wisconsin Health Requirements. They will heavily examine for warts and ringworm. A vet will be at check-in to check health papers and inspect animals.

Arts & Crafts, Photography, Promotional Poster and Graphic Design

  • Think out of the box: Create/capture things that describe your personality and you will use in the future. The project is always more special when it means something to you, plus judges like to see your personality shine out through your projects.
  • Options: Always have several options to choose from, then narrow it down. Be sure to gather opinions from other people if you’re stumped, but remember your opinion is always the most important.
  • Attention grabber: First impressions are everything, when the judges see you project you want it to stick out and be unique.
  • Come prepared: Be sure to fill out your name tag and statement of originality, so that check-in goes smoothly.
  • Reminder: All exhibits should promote the Shorthorn breed.

Cattlemen’s Written Test

  • Try something new: This is a new contest this year! Step out of your comfort zone and test your knowledge.
  • Come prepared: Don’t come into the test blindsided; study beef industry and Shorthorn breed facts.

Mentor Apprentice

  • Meet a new friend: A great rule to live by is to is meet three new friends at every show you go to, no matter what their age is. Attend Youth Conference I to either get pair with a younger member or older member for the week. This is a great way to get involved and meet new people from other states.

Showmanship

  • Presentation: Although this is a no-fit showmanship competition, make sure your animal is clean and ready to walk in the show ring.
  • Confidence: Be sure to bring confidence to the show ring to show the judge you are comfortable with your animal. This is a major thing judges look for.
  • Be on time! Make sure you give yourself plenty of time to prepare you animal. Each judge moves at their own pace, keep an eye on how on the speed of the judge so you know when to have your animal ready.
  • Senior Showmanship: The top 10 seniors will complete the showmanship competition by fitting and then showing their animal at the conclusion of the day. Competitors will receive 45 minutes to fit their animal.
  • Reminders:
  • Bulls cannot be shown
  • There’s a peewee competition for Juniors under the age of 5
  • You must use the same animal throughout the competition

Team Salesmanship and Speech

  • What is the Judge looking for?
    • Confidence: Own what you know. Present all your information with confidence. Make sure you are speaking clearly and loudly. This shows that know what you are talking about and are proud of your work.
    • Eye contact: Making the appropriate amount of eye contact is important when presenting. Practice at home presenting to a group of people so you feel comfortable.

Reminders:

  • The judges will ask questions
  • Dress for Speech Contest: prospectors are school clothes, seniors are semi-formal.
  • Team Salesmanship: You must be there 20 minutes before your scheduled time.

Fitting

  • Teamwork: Know each team members strengths and weaknesses, then assign each job to the appropriate team member based off that.
  • Plan ahead: Make a plan with each team member, so it is clear they know what they will be doing. Divide it up so everyone has a job and is always working. A strong plan will make it, so the 30 minutes run smoothly and efficient.
  • Keep it clean: Keep your area clean so the judges can easily get around and examine your teams work.

Reminders:

  • Animals may enter the ring with a show halter in the prospector division only.
  • Don’t forget any of your supplies, generators are encouraged to make sure you have enough power.
  • Team members may be from any state as this doesn’t go towards the outstanding State award.

Judging

  • Things to know: The contest is scheduled to include 4 cattle classes (12 minutes per class). There will be 10 questions. PI will only judge two classes and then be dismissed.

Not signed up as an exhibitor for Junior Nationals? But you are a member of the American Junior Shorthorn Association? You can still compete in the contests! Just pay the exhibitor fee and sign up at Junior Nationals!

Our goal is to make this the “Greatest Show on Earth” for all ages. For kids 5 or under there’s still lots of fun activities to participate in “Under the Big Top”!  Sign up at http://signup.com/go/BRpDHqm.

Hope we could answer any last–minute questions for this year’s Junior National contests. Take a look at the Edge so you’re aware of all the contest rules. If you have any more questions regarding any of the contests or need tips and advice feel free to contact us here at the office!

 

Alabama Family Shares Passion for Shorthorn Cattle

Catrett FamilyIn Luverne, Alabama, Perry and Ashley Catrett raise their daughters, Cassidy and Cameron. Even though Perry and Ashley did not grow up showing cattle, their daughters expressed an interest in showing. Cassidy and Cameron started out showing crossbred and commercial cattle because their dad and his family raised commercial cattle.

After Cassidy and Cameron proved their commitment to showing, they family decided to start showing purebred cattle and purchased three Shorthorns to start a herd. They found that it was difficult to find Shorthorns in Alabama and other southeastern states, but they chose Shorthorns initially for their docility and color.

“Their dad likes that they have taken an interest in the beef industry,” Ashley said. “He thinks that showing helped them develop their passion that they may not have if they would have only stuck to the commercial cattle.”

Cassidy and Cameron have built up a herd of Shorthorn cow-calf pairs that is nearly as many cattle as their dad has in his commercial operation.

“The girls have even convinced Perry to use a Shorthorn bull,” Ashley said. “He transitioned to using a Shorthorn bull on the commercial herd as clean-up for artificial insemination work.”

Cassidy the older of the two, developed an interest in AI for bred and owned cattle. She even attended AI school to help grow her knowledge. Cameron has interest in embryo transfer. Ashley said the girls work together to improve their herd.

The Catrett’s began attending the National Junior Shorthorn Show in 2012 and it has been a great way for them to connect with other breeders.

“The girls have been able to learn more by attending nationals and networking with other breeders than they ever would have on their own,” Ashley said. “Shorthorn is our breed of choice and we enjoy having a week to spend with others that have a passion for the breed.”

Cassidy and Cameron were instrumental in starting a state association that now has at least 20 families involved, said Ashley. There is now a breed steer show at their state show and they offer scholarships through the state association.
“My daughters have goals of continuing in the agricultural industry,” Ashley said. “They will always want to have a Shorthorn herd. It is their passion.”

Anna Grace Parnell Wins Supreme Heifer at the Southeastern Livestock Exposition

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (June 10, 2016) – Anna Grace Parnell is a sophomore at Northeastern Oklahoma College Parnellwhere she is on the livestock judging team. Originally from Stanton, Alabama, she has shown Shorthorns since she was nine years old.

As a pre-vet major, Parnell plans on attending veterinarian school after NEO. She is unsure where she will go to vet school yet, but hopes it will be Oklahoma State University. She has plans to become an embryologist. Parnell said even if she does not go to vet school she plans on staying heavily involved in agriculture.

PH MF RSF MAX ROSA 407 ET
PH MF RSF MAX ROSA 407 ET (2016 winner)

In March, at the Southeastern Livestock Exposition, Parnell won champion Shorthorn and supreme champion heifer. This was her second year to win champion Shorthorn and supreme champion heifer at this show because she previously won in 2014.

Parnell won senior showmanship at the 2015 Alabama Junior Cattleman’s Roundup and received a scholarship from the Alabama Cattlewomen’s Association. This scholarship was a contest for just high school senior and college freshman girls. Parnell tried three times before she won this prestigious scholarship.

POLY EMB AUGUSTA PRIDE ET
POLY EMB AUGUSTA PRIDE ET (2014 winner)

She has attended many National Junior Shorthorn Show and Youth Conference’s with her brother James Robert Parnell and her family has been active in the ASA for more than seven years.

American Shorthorn Association, 7607 NW Prairie View Road, Kansas City, MO 64151

Phone 816.599.7777; fax number 816.599.7782

The mission of the ASA is to provide quality service and support to its members by promoting the value of Shorthorn cattle in all aspects of the beef industry, while maintaining the integrity of the herd book and performance database. The ASA is headquartered in Omaha, Neb., and was founded in 1872 with herd book records going back to 1822. As one of the oldest American breed associations, the ASA provides services for more than 6,000 junior and senior members who register nearly 14,000 cattle annually. The American Junior Shorthorn Association promotes personal development through youth activities and educational events. The AJSA is dedicated to the betterment of its members, promotes valuable skills, and fosters friendships that will last a lifetime. To learn more, contact the ASA office or visit www.shorthorn.org or www.juniorshorthorn.com.

# # #

KEY Conference 2016

The 2016 KEY Conference is coming up July 29 – July 31 and will take place in California. The registration deadline is July 15th.

Click here for the registration application and more details.

Going to NJSS? Need a Place To Stay?

Where to Stay

Radisson:

There is a block of rooms on hold for Junior Nationals at the Radisson. *only King rooms are available
www.radisson.com/shorthorn

Hampton:

The Hampton Roseville opened on June 2nd and is now taking reservations.

Click here for more details and for reservations.

Campsites:
For reservations please call Tammy Nye 612-618-8566 or email tnyehome@gmail.com

Intern Update: Favorite Beef Recipe

Hey there!

Abbey and Taylor again. We are officially in the month of June and less than a month out from Junior Nationals.  So excited to be there and get to meet all of you. Entering entries to the computer and contacting members for exhibitor packet information makes us feel like we almost know you a bit. (Does that sound creepy, it might be.)

Today instead of giving you an update on our lives as interns (because really the only update is that we are working hard to have everything ready for Junior Nationals), we are going to share our favorite beef recipes. We were inspired to write this post after finding some AJSA aprons in a very cold storage room that Abbey dubbed as the ‘meat locker’.

Abbey’s recipe ­– There is this amazing little taco truck a couple towns over from where I went to high school in Colorado called Lucy’s Tacos. After trying many different items on their menu with at least 50 different options, I discovered their Carne Asada Fries.  When I moved 10 hours away to Oklahoma for college I had to find a way to keep these fries in my life, so I developed my own recipe.

AbCarne-asada-friesbey’s Carne Asada Fries

Prep time- 45 min. to an hour. (Most of this is down time letting the fries soak)

Cook Time-45 min. to an hour.

Total time- 1.5 to 2 hours.

Serving size – 4 people

Ingredients – Fries

  • 4 large russet potatoes
  • 2-3 tablespoon olive oil, or preferred cooking oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste (most days I like to add in a little garlic salt)

Ingredients – Toppings

  • Half pound to a pound of steak – depends on how much meat you want. I prefer a nice marble tri-tip steak for some extra flavor, but you can also use skirt steak of steak you want.
  • Weber Steak and Chop seasoning to taste
  • Shredded cheese – I like a three cheese Mexican blend, but from here on out the ingredients are all personal preference
  • Sour Cream
  • Avocado or guacamole
  • Salsa
  • Shredded lettuce

Instructions

  1. Cut the potatoes into sticks, about a quarter inch to half inch thick depending on how you like your fries. Then place the fries into a bowl of ice water and soak for 30 min. to an hour. This will help the fries to be nice and crunchy.
  2. Preheat oven to 425F
  3. After the fries have soaked, rinse and dry them thoroughly. Use 1 tablespoon of the oil to coat a baking sheet then toss the fries in the rest and season to taste. Spread the fries even over the baking sheet and cook at 425F for 45 min to an hour until nice and golden. Turn the fries about halfway through.
  4. After the fries are in the oven cut the steak into half inch cubes and coat the cubes in the Weber’s seasoning and let sit at room temperature until ready to cook.
  5. When the fries have about 15 min. left cook the meat in a skillet on medium0high heat. I like to use a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet or a griddle for a nice sear but any skillet will work. If needed add a little bit of olive oil to keep the meat from sticking and burning.
  6. When the fries are nice and golden turn the oven off and remove them. I like to layer on some cheese and place the fries back in the still warm oven to melt the cheese.
  7. Plate the fries and add toping as desired.
  8. Enjoy!

Unfortunately I don’t have a picture of my Carne Asada fries, but I have provided one I found from www.carlsbadcraving.com that is similar to what I based my recipe off.

stuffed peppers

Taylor’s Recipe:

As we all know, nothing beats Grandma’s cooking and I am pretty much certain my granny is the best cook of all! Growing up just a hop, skip, and a jump away from her house, I spent many days learning all the tricks to making the perfect dish. Moving 1,300 miles provided me with the chance to practice all that she taught me. Although, I will never be the cook she is, I think I have done a good job of perfecting a few recipes.  One of my all-time favorites to make is stuff bell peppers. Especially if they are fresh peppers straight out of Papa’s garden! With little preparation time, this is the perfect meal to toss in the oven on a busy night.

Prep time: 15-20 minutes

Cook time: 30-45 minutes

Total time:  45-65 minutes

Serving size: 6-8 peppers

Ingredients:

  • 6-8 bell peppers
  • 1 box New Orleans dirty rice
  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • 1 can of tomato sauce (8 oz.)
  • Shredded Mozzarella cheese

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Brown the ground beef in a large frying pan and add in the chopped onion, cooking until the vegetable is softened.
  3. Next, add salt and pepper to taste, and then add the can of tomato sauce.
  4. Stir in cooked rice and cook for another 5 minutes or until the rice is warm. (Meanwhile, cut the tops of the peppers off and spoon out the rubs and seeds. Rinse.)
  5. Lightly, sprinkle the inside of the pepper with salt and fill the peppers with the hot meat and rice mixture.
  6. In the bottom of a 3 quart baking dish, put a ¼ cup of water (so you can steam the peppers while they are cooking).
  7. Place peppers in baking dish and top with shredded cheese.
  8. Bake for 30-45 minutes at 350 degrees until the peppers are tender and the cheese is brown.
  9. Serve hot & enjoy!

 

 

apronsHope you have been practicing your beef cook-off recipes! It will be time to show those cooking skills off before you know it!

 

Shorthorn love,

Abbey & Taylor