Essentials for a Successful Week

Only 6 more days until we are all “Under the Big Top” in Madison, Wisconsin! Here in the office we are packing things up and figured we would remind you all about the essentials you need to survive the week.

As you pack your trailer to head to Junior Nationals here is a tune (and show packing list) for you to listen to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qS8nU9qxVTk.

ESSENTIALS:

                                                      WATER

HYDRATE. HYDRATE. HYDRATE. Make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day. Days in the barn can get long and will be even longer if you’re not properly hydrated.

 

SNACKS

Busy days at Junior Nationals can cause kids to get “Hangry.” Be sure to pack all your favorite snacks. Here is a list of our favorite snacks at cattle shows:

Emily M.: Grapes, Chex Mix, Pringles

Anna: Pita Chips, Hummus, Salami

Emily D.: Cheese sticks, Cheez-Its, Cinnamon Rolls

 

COMFORTABLE SHOES

Standing on cement all day can be hard on the feet. Be sure to pack a variety of shoes to switch out from day to day. You will appreciate this decision later in the week.

 

HAIR

Your cattle’s hair typically always comes first, so remember Revive and brushes to make sure their hair is on point for the show ring. Next, your hair. Rain is in the forecast!! Hats are a lifesaver on rainy days, or even days you just want to sleep in an extra 10 minutes.

 

REGISTRATION PAPERS

Don’t get to check-in and end up getting the “YOU HAD ONE JOB” look. Make sure those registration papers and health papers are in a safe spot to bring to check-in.

 

PROJECTS

Don’t forget to pack those projects you have spent countless hours on! Make sure to bring extra supplies, just in case something gets messed up on the drive!

 

POSITIVE ATTITUDE

The most important thing to pack along: a positive attitude. Cattle shows call for early mornings and late evenings, but a positive attitude always makes it more enjoyable. This week is about making memories that you’ll cherish for a life time, while making new friends along the way.

 

Hope we could help with your preparation for Junior Nationals! Safe travels as you make your way to Madison!

American Rancher featuring Shorthorn Cattle

This is the most recent American Rancher featuring Shorthorn cattle. The ASA slogan ‘Performance with Purpose’ truly describes the Shorthorn breed and the breeders that raise Shorthorn cattle. Check it out!

 

2018 Herdsman – Ron Rutan

The 2018 Shorthorn Herdsman of the Year was awarded to Ron Rutan of RC Show Cattle in Eaton, Ohio. His long history of being involved in the Shorthorn breed began with his parents and grandparents raising Shorthorns. Rutan started RC Show Cattle with Christy Campbell in 1991 and from there he stayed actively involved with Shorthorns.

Rutan has taken cattle all over the country to many national shows over the years and in the last ten years he has displayed quite a few Shorthorn bulls in the yards at the National Western Stock Show.

“We bred the bull Damn Proud and when that bull came along Ron became even more enthusiastic about Shorthorns,” Campbell said.

Rutan has served as a director of the Ohio Shorthorn Association. RC Show Cattle also has an Annual Early Bird Sale on the Saturday of Labor Day weekend to auction their cattle.

Outside of being involved with Shorthorns, Rutan has owned and operated a fence construction business for the last 33 years as well as custom hoof trimming. Many people come from all over Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky to have Rutan trim hooves of their show cattle. Rutan also was Texas for a little bit in the 1970s and had a custom fitting service.

“We always are particular in picking a good string for Louisville,” Campbell said. “RC Show Cattle usually has 13 or 14 head there and people respect that. There are also not many people from Ohio that take cattle to Denver. Ron and Clair Bye took three head and came home with five banners. I would say that is pretty great. People also respect Ron’s quietness and that he isn’t arrogant.”

Rutan said the Shorthorn heritage goes way back in his genes and they were one of the first breeds he worked with growing up. Shorthorns have remained in his life but he enjoys working with all breeds of cattle.

“It was quite the honor to be selected as herdsman,” Rutan said. “It was a total surprise to be chosen. I never would have expected it. It is pretty gratifying to be recognized. I just work hard and do what I love.”

The Shorthorn Herdsman award is in honor of Lawrence Grathwohl, presented by the Grathwohl family and sponsored by the Shorthorn Foundation. Congratulations to Ron Rutan on being selected as the 2018 Shorthorn Herdsman of the Year.

Alabama Family Shares Passion for Shorthorn Cattle

Catrett FamilyIn Luverne, Alabama, Perry and Ashley Catrett raise their daughters, Cassidy and Cameron. Even though Perry and Ashley did not grow up showing cattle, their daughters expressed an interest in showing. Cassidy and Cameron started out showing crossbred and commercial cattle because their dad and his family raised commercial cattle.

After Cassidy and Cameron proved their commitment to showing, they family decided to start showing purebred cattle and purchased three Shorthorns to start a herd. They found that it was difficult to find Shorthorns in Alabama and other southeastern states, but they chose Shorthorns initially for their docility and color.

“Their dad likes that they have taken an interest in the beef industry,” Ashley said. “He thinks that showing helped them develop their passion that they may not have if they would have only stuck to the commercial cattle.”

Cassidy and Cameron have built up a herd of Shorthorn cow-calf pairs that is nearly as many cattle as their dad has in his commercial operation.

“The girls have even convinced Perry to use a Shorthorn bull,” Ashley said. “He transitioned to using a Shorthorn bull on the commercial herd as clean-up for artificial insemination work.”

Cassidy the older of the two, developed an interest in AI for bred and owned cattle. She even attended AI school to help grow her knowledge. Cameron has interest in embryo transfer. Ashley said the girls work together to improve their herd.

The Catrett’s began attending the National Junior Shorthorn Show in 2012 and it has been a great way for them to connect with other breeders.

“The girls have been able to learn more by attending nationals and networking with other breeders than they ever would have on their own,” Ashley said. “Shorthorn is our breed of choice and we enjoy having a week to spend with others that have a passion for the breed.”

Cassidy and Cameron were instrumental in starting a state association that now has at least 20 families involved, said Ashley. There is now a breed steer show at their state show and they offer scholarships through the state association.
“My daughters have goals of continuing in the agricultural industry,” Ashley said. “They will always want to have a Shorthorn herd. It is their passion.”

Anna Grace Parnell Wins Supreme Heifer at the Southeastern Livestock Exposition

KANSAS CITY, Missouri (June 10, 2016) – Anna Grace Parnell is a sophomore at Northeastern Oklahoma College Parnellwhere she is on the livestock judging team. Originally from Stanton, Alabama, she has shown Shorthorns since she was nine years old.

As a pre-vet major, Parnell plans on attending veterinarian school after NEO. She is unsure where she will go to vet school yet, but hopes it will be Oklahoma State University. She has plans to become an embryologist. Parnell said even if she does not go to vet school she plans on staying heavily involved in agriculture.

PH MF RSF MAX ROSA 407 ET
PH MF RSF MAX ROSA 407 ET (2016 winner)

In March, at the Southeastern Livestock Exposition, Parnell won champion Shorthorn and supreme champion heifer. This was her second year to win champion Shorthorn and supreme champion heifer at this show because she previously won in 2014.

Parnell won senior showmanship at the 2015 Alabama Junior Cattleman’s Roundup and received a scholarship from the Alabama Cattlewomen’s Association. This scholarship was a contest for just high school senior and college freshman girls. Parnell tried three times before she won this prestigious scholarship.

POLY EMB AUGUSTA PRIDE ET
POLY EMB AUGUSTA PRIDE ET (2014 winner)

She has attended many National Junior Shorthorn Show and Youth Conference’s with her brother James Robert Parnell and her family has been active in the ASA for more than seven years.

American Shorthorn Association, 7607 NW Prairie View Road, Kansas City, MO 64151

Phone 816.599.7777; fax number 816.599.7782

The mission of the ASA is to provide quality service and support to its members by promoting the value of Shorthorn cattle in all aspects of the beef industry, while maintaining the integrity of the herd book and performance database. The ASA is headquartered in Omaha, Neb., and was founded in 1872 with herd book records going back to 1822. As one of the oldest American breed associations, the ASA provides services for more than 6,000 junior and senior members who register nearly 14,000 cattle annually. The American Junior Shorthorn Association promotes personal development through youth activities and educational events. The AJSA is dedicated to the betterment of its members, promotes valuable skills, and fosters friendships that will last a lifetime. To learn more, contact the ASA office or visit www.shorthorn.org or www.juniorshorthorn.com.

# # #

KEY Conference 2016

The 2016 KEY Conference is coming up July 29 – July 31 and will take place in California. The registration deadline is July 15th.

Click here for the registration application and more details.

ASA Hires Rogers As Director of Marketing & Communications

The American Shorthorn Association hired Shelby Rogers as the Director of Marketing and Communications.

RogersRogers graduated from Oklahoma State University on May 7, 2016 with a degree in animal science and agricultural communications. During her time at OSU she was a member of the Oklahoma Collegiate Cattlewomen, Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow, and she was on the staff of the Cowboy Journal magazine. Rogers was selected as McKnight Leader Scholar for her four years of college because of her previous leadership experiences.

Originally from Hamilton, Texas, her family started their ranch in 2000, raising Registered Hereford cattle. Rogers was active in the American Hereford Association, serving on the National Junior Hereford Association board from 2011-2014. While on the board, Rogers served as fundraising chair and leadership chair. As a director she helped in planning the Junior National Hereford Exposition and served as a role model to younger members. She also served as a director for the Texas Junior Polled Hereford Association for eight years.

Rogers held multiple internships that prepared her for this job. One specific position was the marketing and communications internship for Accelerated Genetics in Baraboo, Wisconsin. She designed advertisements, photographed farms, and wrote press releases. This internship gave her new experiences working with dairy cattle and different breeds of beef cattle. She also had a social media internship one summer and she handled social media planning for many different companies.

“Her passion for the beef industry and previous experiences will make her a great addition to the American Shorthorn Association staff,” said Montie D. Soules, Executive Secretary/CEO of ASA. “We look forward to having her on board with us. Shelby will bring new ideas to help in the rebranding of the Shorthorn breed.”

Summer 2016 Internships Announced

We would like to welcome to the ASA/AJSA team our summer 2016 interns, Abbey Martin and Taylor Wilkinds.

Abbey Martin of Rocky Ford, Colorado is attending Oklahoma State University with a major in Agricultural Communications and a minor in Agribusiness. She will be receiving her diploma upon Abbeycompletion of her internship here at ASA. She is most excited about working with professionals in the industry and improving her skills in a true work environment. She hopes to learn some of the ins and out of what a breed association does on a day to day basis and how she can improve and progress in the industry. Martin’s livestock background consists of helping her parents with their 40 head herd, showing steers in 4-H for nine years, along with her experience of being a carcass data collector on the end of the production side.

 

 

Taylor Wilkins comes to us from Brooker, Florida. She is from a small rural county where she grew up raising and showing market steers, as well as purebred Angus heifers. She is attending Iowa TaylorState University majoring in Agricultural & Life Sciences Education. Wilkin’s is looking forward to being surrounded by professionals/experts in the industry and is excited to work with a group of individuals who share similar passions as her. She is thrilled about the opportunity to gain knowledge and experience, and is excited to learn how the association functions on a daily basis. In addition, she hopes to learn more about the Shorthorn breed itself and the impact it has on the cattle market.

What To Expect From Genomic Testing

The new multi-breed genetic evaluation with the American Simmental Association has been a fairly smooth transition from a data and EPD perspective. Coupled with the database move to Digital Beef, there’s been a lot to digest in the last 12 months. Breeders have done a tremendous job of adopting and understanding the new breed averages and variation versus the old system. Likewise, your dedication to seeing that genomics is a tool in the box for all Shorthorn breeders has been incredible. On the other hand, much to our disappointment, the genomics ‘train’ has been an extremely slow ride with a number of stops, delays, and outright frustrations. Rest assured, the train is still on the tracks and headed in the right direction, albeit at a sluggish pace. This article should help prepare you for when the genomics train finally reaches the station. As well, it will offer insight for when utilizing genomics is a good idea versus other genetic selection tools already in your arsenal.

First of all, it is extremely important breeders understand genomic tests are not the ‘golden egg’ to beef production, maybe just the shiniest one of the dozen. Likewise, genomics cannot replace the need for collecting performance and carcass information on your herd. In reality, data submission is more important than ever to ensure that the money you invest in a genomic test is worth the spend. Like every other column on the paper, a genomic score is only as good as the data behind it, or in front of it (chronologically) in this case. Genomic tests are generated by taking information from higher accuracy animals, then using it to help predict the performance of young, low accuracy animals. As a result, genomics can only enhance the traits we already collect. For example, Shorthorn breeders will not be able to pull a hair or blood sample to enhance udder quality or docility until an EPD for those traits exists.

Which animals in my herd do I test? When do I collect and submit the samples?

In developing the tests, we asked for semen and/or DNA samples on older A.I. sires. Moving forward, there will be no reason to dig in the tank and test old genetics. Genomics cannot help the EPDs of high accuracy animals; they were used as the baseline for comparison to get the breed started towards genomic-enhanced EPDs. The true value of genomics is enhancing young animals not yet old enough to generate progeny, particularly daughters in production. Under the current system, a sire is 4-5 years old before performance data from his daughters can affect his EPD profile. A genomic test can fast forward some traits on the paper as if the bull already has 15 daughters in production! Young bulls or heifers that show promise can be tested as young as 1 month of age. If pulling hair, be sure that the root follicles or “root bulbs” come out with the hair strand. A blood sample may be better for extremely young cattle. Results from the genomic test may help breeders make decisions on how to manage or market that individual.

Many breeders collect DNA samples for genomic testing at either weaning or yearling. The cattle are in the chute, making the collection of hair or blood a part of the routine. Decisions can be made at a later date as to which animals actually get submitted; no need to submit DNA on critters headed to the cull pen or feedlot. In contrast, samples need to be submitted well in advance of printed sale catalogs. For example, if your bulls or females sell in March, submit the DNA in the fall so results enter the genetic evaluation and enhance the EPDs that typically come out in January.

 

What could I learn from the genomic information?

The days of stars and 1-10 scores for individual traits are gone. All genomic results are incorporated into the EPDs of the individual. It is important to note that genomics cannot “enhance” every trait on the paper equally. Unfortunately, some traits are largely controlled by the environment the calf endures; others are much more controlled by genetics. For example, the sex of the calf and the color of the hide are 100% controlled by genetics. No matter what we do to that animal from a management standpoint will not change the sex or the color of the calf at birth. On the other hand, a trait like Maternal Calving Ease EPD has a huge environmental component. How we feed, breed, and manage that cow can largely affect her ability to calve. However, genomics can play a significant role in this trait by offering genetic insight to the likelihood that a bull’s daughter will calve on their own. In a nutshell, the harder the trait is to measure, the more important genomics can become at enhancing the EPD.

Genomics also somewhat rely on the heritability of a trait. Heritability is the measure from 0 to 1 used to describe the level of genetic influence on the trait versus environment. Some look at heritability like a percentage of the phenotype that is ‘inherited’ by genetics. The higher the number, the more genetics influence the result. Marbling is a unique trait where genomics has been successful. Heritability for marbling is considered moderately heritable at approximately 0.30-0.35 for most breeds. A few small segments of the genome in some breeds do a very good job of predicting marbling, so the genomic test is successful. Other traits like Scrotal Circumference have very low heritability (0.10-0.15). If a genomic test can find markers that have a large influence on scrotal circumference, then the test has value. However, if scrotal circumference is truly controlled by thousands of gene segments, then the likelihood a genomic test is useful is very low. Breed to breed, genomics may show real promise for a trait in one breed, but be virtually useless in another breed. As a result, breed associations must independently develop and validate their own genomic tests.

Please don’t let the chart below overwhelm you; it can be very useful in understanding the effect genomics can have on an EPD. The Accuracy from 0 to 1 is down the left side. Individual EPDs are across the top. Keep in mind that some columns are not Shorthorn EPDs…yet. Most all pedigree estimate EPDs (the average of the sire and dam’s EPDs) come in under 0.10 Accuracy. Obviously, if the breeder reports calving ease, birth, weaning, and yearling data on the bull, the Accuracy for the bull’s growth traits can go up to roughly 0.35. Let’s use BW as an example. Patrick Article - ChartIf you buy a yearling bull that is a +2.0 on BW EPD and his Accuracy is 0.10, the chart tells us that 68% of the time (1 standard deviation) the bull’s “true” EPD for BW will be between -0.7 and 4.7. And yes, 32% of the time, his true EPD could be even worse…or even better than that.

If the Shorthorn genomic test is run on that bull, his BW EPD may be +2.5 with an Accuracy of .40. Now, refer to the chart. The bull is now plus or minus 1.8, making his EPD likely between +0.7 and +4.3. We gain confidence that the bull is likely not a candidate for heifers. I would encourage you to enter the following link in your browser and read Dr. Scott Greiner’s article that further explains the chart.

https://www.herdbook.org/simmapp/action/pages.PagesAction/eventSubmit_displayPage/T/pageId/15/

Given our relatively small sample size, genomics for the Shorthorn breed will be an ongoing commitment from breeders of all sizes. The more performance data that gets submitted, the better the genomic tests can become. As an example, if we find a “rock star” bull for Marbling EPD based on ultrasound and the genomic test, we still need to follow his progeny to the rail and collect marbling scores or at least scan his sons and daughters to prove the bull even further. Then, we revalidate the genomic test for Marbling EPD and it becomes even more powerful and more significant as a tool for selection. In the end, genomics can be a real asset to breeders with just a few cows, those that rely heavily on embryo transfer, or breeders with large contemporary groups as they try to find ‘the one’ that will give them an edge or move their herd forward at an accelerated pace. The train is comin’.

Written By: American Shorthorn Association contributor, Patrick Wall

Patrick can be reached at patwall@iastate.edu

IGS Cattlemen’s Seminar: June 14

Join the multi-breed partners of International Genetic Solutions on June 14, 2016 prior to the 2016 Beef Improvement Federation Annual Convention to learn about this unprecedented collaboration and the power of multi-breed genetic evaluation. This event is free to attend.

June 14, 2016
10:30 a.m.-12:00 noon
BIF Headquarters Hotel
Hilton Garden Inn Manhattan
410 S 3rd Street
Manhattan, Kansas

Speakers Include:

  • Dr. Bruce Golden, Theta Solutions
  • Donnell Brown, RA Brown Ranch
  • Tracy Brunner, NCBA President, Cow Camp Ranch
  • Steve Munger, Eagle Pass Ranch
  • Chip Ramsay, Rex Ranches
  • Tom Brink, Red Angus Association of America
  • Bruce Holmquist, Canadian Simmental Association
  • Dr. Wade Shafer, American Simmental Association
  • Montie Soules, American Shorthorn Association

For more information go to www.internationalgeneticsolutions.com.